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Full text of "Cornell University- New York Hospital School of Nursing Announcement"

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in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/cornelluniversit19761978corn 



fell University Announcements 



« O O O O 




Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



Cornell University 



Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 
515 East 71 Street 
New York, New York 10021 



1976-77 



Cornell University Announcements 

Volume 68 of the Cornell University Announcements 
consists of fourteen catalogs, of which this is number 
5 dated July 12, 1976. Publication dates: fourteen 
times a year (four times in August; twice in March, 
April, and September; once in May, July. October, and 
November). Publisher: Cornell University, Sheldon 
Court, 420 College Avenue, Ithaca, New York 14853. 
Second-class postage paid at Ithaca, New York. 



Academic Calendar 



1976-1977 



Registration, summer session; 
instruction begins 9:00 a.m. 

Summer session ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Orientation, Class of 1978, begins 9:00 a.m. 

Opening convocation, 3:00 p.m. 

Orientation, Class of 1978, ends 5:00 p.m. 

Registration, all students 

Labor Day holiday 

Fall term instruction begins, all classes, 8:00 a.m. 

School holiday 

Progress grades due, all classes, 12:00 noon 

Preregistration for mtersession and spring semester, 
continuing students 

Thanksgiving recess: 
Instruction suspended, 1:00 p.m. 
Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Fall term instruction ends, all classes, 5:00 p.m. 

Study day 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin, 
9 a.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation end, 
5:00 p.m. 

Christmas recess begins, 5:00 p.m. 

Intersession begins, 9:00 a.m. 

Intersession ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Registration, new and rejoining students, 9:00 a.m. 



Tuesday, August 3 
Tuesday, August 24 
Wednesday, September 1 
Wednesday, September 1 
Friday, September 3 
Friday, September 3 
Monday, September 6 
Tuesday, September 7 
Monday, October 1 1 
Friday, November 5 

November 15-19 

Wednesday, November 24 
Monday, November 29 

Monday, December 13 

Tuesday, December 14 

Wednesday, December 15 

Friday, December 17 
Friday, December 17 
Wednesday, January 5 
Thursday, January 27 
Friday, January 28 



Orientation, new and rejoining students, 1:00 p.m. 

Spring term instruction begins, all classes. 8:00 a.m. 

School holiday 

Spring recess: 
Instruction suspended, 5:00 p.m. 
Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Midsemester grades due, 5:00 p.m. 

Preregistration for summer session and fall 
semester, continuing students 

School holiday, Centennial celebration 

Spring term instruction ends, all classes, 5:00 p.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin, 
1:00 p.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation end, 
5:00 p.m. 

Grades due, Class of 1977, 5:00 p.m. 

Convocation and Commencement 

Grades due. Class of 1978, 5:00 p.m. 



Friday, January 28 
Monday, January 31 
Monday, February 21 

Friday, March 18 
Monday, March 28 

Thursday, April 7 

April 18-22 
May 5-7 
Friday, May 13 

Monday, May 16 

Thursday, May 19 
Thursday, May 19 
Wednesday, May 25 
Friday, May 27 



The dates shown in the Academic Calendar are sub- 
ject to change at any time by official action of Cornell 
University 

In enacting this calendar, the University Senate has 
scheduled classes on religious holidays. It is the intent 
of Senate legislation that students missing classes due 
to the observance of religious holidays be given ample 
opportunity to make up work 



Announcements 



Contents 



2 Academic Calendar 

7 History of the School 

8 Accreditation 

8 The Undergraduate Program 

13 Admission 

1 4 Grades and Academic Standing 
1 5 Degree Requirements 

1 7 State Registration for Graduates 

1 7 Expenses 

18 Financial Assistance 

20 General Information 

21 Division of Continuing Education 
21 Facilities for Instruction 

23 Description of Courses 

27 Register 

33 Index 

35 Application 

36 List of Announcements 



The courses and curricula described in this 
Announcement, and the teaching personnel listed 
herein, are subject to change at any time by official 
action of Cornell University. 



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Cornell University 



Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



History of the School 



The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing was established as a school in Cornell Uni- 
versity in 1942. on the sixty-fifth anniversary of the 
founding of The New York Hospital School of Nursing. 
One of the earliest nursing schools in the country, 
the School is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center, which includes also the Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College and the various buildings of 
The New York Hospital extending from Sixty-eighth 
to Seventy-first Streets on the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of the Society of 
the New York Hospital and Cornell University, and 
is committed to a fourfold purpose including: (1 ) care 
of the sick, providing the same wisdom and skill to 
rich and poor; (2) education of doctors and nurses, 
research workers, technicians, and others who will 
work in the field of medical science; (3) research to 
extend the boundaries of knowledge in the health 
fields; and (4) the promotion of public health through 
the development of preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second-oldest voluntary 
hospital in this country— its royal charter having been 
granted in 1 771 in the reign of King George III. The 
first patients were soldiers wounded in the Revolu- 
tionary War. At that time the Hospital was located on 
the lower end of Manhattan, the only part of the city 
then settled. On early maps the location was 
designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Cornell University, with its campus in Ithaca. New 
York, received its charter in 1865. Three circum- 
stances contributed to the founding of the University 
in the eventful years that marked the close of the 
Civil War. In the first place. Ezra Cornell, a citizen of 
Ithaca, had come into a large fortune from his hold- 
ings in the newly formed Western Union Telegraph 
Company and had devoted much thought to the good 
that might be done by giving his wealth to education. 
A second circumstance was the fact that the state of 
New York had received a substantial land grant, 
under the Morrill Act of 1862. for the support of 
colleges teaching agriculture and the mechanical arts. 
The third circumstance was that Mr. Cornell had as a 
colleague in the state legislature of 1864-65. a young 



senator named Andrew D White, later to become the 
first president of the University, who had the vision 
of preserving the state's land grant intact for a single 
great institution which should teach not only agri- 
culture and the mechanical arts but the humanities 
and the sciences as well. The Medical College, the 
School of Nursing, and the Graduate School of Medi- 
cal Sciences are the divisions of the University which 
are located in New York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over one hun- 
dred years before a school for the training of nurses 
was opened. Early steps had been taken, however, to 
improve the care given to patients. In 1799 Dr. Valen- 
tine Seamen, a scholar and prominent physician, had 
organized a series of lectures, combined with a course 
of practical instruction in the wards, for the women 
whom the Hospital had engaged as "watchers" and 
"nurses " Although the theoretical content was meager 
and the practical instruction not systematically 
planned, these classes focused attention on the fact 
that women who had some preparation for their work 
gave better care than those without instruction. 
When, in 1873, the first training school in this country 
on the Nightingale pattern was opened in Bellevue 
Hospital, the Governors of the Society of the New 
York Hospital contributed to its support. Four years 
later, in 1877. when the Hospital moved to new build- 
ings, The New York Hospital Training School for 
Nurses was opened in quarters which were considered 
to have all the modern improvements of the times 
The School moved to the present location when the 
Medical Center was opened in 1932. 

Since 1946 all students admitted to the Under- 
graduate Division have been candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. In 1968. noting a 
shift in the educational background of individuals 
seeking admission to the School, a separate program 
for college graduates was started. As of the fall of 
1975. all students admitted to the generic bacca- 
laureate program must have the minimum of a bache- 
lor's degree in another discipline prior to admission. 

In the fall of 1974, the School began to admit small 
groups of registered nurses to an upper-division 
major in nursing leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing 

The Division of Continuing Education was organized 
as an educational unit of the School of Nursing in 



8 Undergraduate Program 



1971. Although it is a nondegree-granting division of 
the School, it has the same status within the structure 
as the organizational unit for undergraduate programs 
leading to a degree. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing Alumni Association, originally the Alumnae 
Association of The New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the ten 
alumnae associations that helped to bring about the 
national professional organization of nurses, now 
known as the American Nurses' Association. In 1945 
the Alumni Association became a part of the Cornell 
University Alumni Association. 



Accreditation 

The School is accredited by the Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs of the 
National League for Nursing as a generic college pro- 
gram leading to a baccalaureate degree. 

The School is registered by the State Education 
Department, Division of Professional Education of 
the University of the State of New York. Cornell 
University is accredited by the Middle States Re- 
gional Accreditation Association. 

Undergraduate Program 

The Curricula 

The School of Nursing offers an undergraduate pro- 
gram for college graduates and one for registered 
nurses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing. In order to be eligible for the degree from 
Cornell, the last thirty credits must be taken in one 
of these programs. Each student entering the School 
is expected to complete the entire program for which 
he or she is enrolled. To meet the objectives of each 
program, students will have clinical experience in a 
variety of hospital and community settings. 

The faculty reserves the right to make changes in the 
curriculum that it believes are in keeping with the 
changing needs of society or in the best interests of 
the student and the School. 



Goals of the University 

The University's basic objective is to produce men 
and women of intellect and to equip them to use their 
abilities wisely. Cornell is not solely a place for 
memorizing data or mastering a vocation. It is, instead, 
a route to intellectual maturity, a means for develop- 
ing the ideas, insights, and values which form a 
permanent capacity for intellectual thought and action. 
Cornell students are prepared to use knowledge well 
for themselves and society. The diversity of Cornell 
contributes breadth and perspective to strong and 
specialized programs of study 

Philosophy of the School of Nursing 

Education 

Education is a process that helps individuals to 



develop their potential so that they may function 
productively within existing and changing social 
systems. This is a dynamic process involving the active 
participation of students and teachers. The school 
provides the environment in which students can test 
their abilities and evaluate their progress. 

The major purposes of the general education courses 
preceding the nursing major are: to instill knowledge; 
to cultivate intellectual skills; and to nurture the 
traits of personality and character basic to a reasoned 
and responsible life. Because of the foundation pro- 
vided by these courses, it is anticipated that students 
will be prepared to better understand themselves, 
their social and physical environment, and the role 
of the professional nurse in society. 



Nursing 

The School of Nursing provides the professional 
education for leadership positions in nursing practice 
in a comprehensive health care system. Professional 
nurses practice interdependently with other health 
care professionals in a variety of health care settings. 
These nurses assume responsibility for promotion of 
individual and professional standards of nursing 
practice. They recognize the need to assume an ad- 
vocacy role on behalf of their clients and to speak on 
community and professional issues that are within 
their field of competence. As professional people they 
recognize the need to continue to develop personal and 
professional competence through the formal and in- 
formal educational structures that are best suited 
to their needs and abilities. 



Objectives of the Professional 
Program 

The nursing program aims to produce graduates who 

will: 
1 Use cognitive skills of assessment, decision 
making, and evaluation in diagnostic, health 
maintenance, preventive, restorative, and 
therapeutic measures. 

2. Understand the interaction of the internal system 
of man with his external system in a health- 
illness continuum 

3. Apply principles of group process in the delivery 
of health care 

4 Function interdependently with other health 
professionals in the management of health care. 

5 Demonstrate characteristics for continuing 
professional development in nursing. 

6 Promote standards of nursing practice through 
assessment of existing practice. 

7. Understand the effect of formal and informal 
structures and the functions of health care de- 
livery systems in relation to nursing practice. 

8 Contribute to constructive change in nursing 
practice 

9 Accept individual responsibility and account- 
ability for nursing practice. 

10 Utilize practice as a means of gathering data for 
refining and extending nursing theory and prac- 
tice. 



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10 Program of Study 



Program of Study 



Organization of Curriculum for the 
College Graduate 

The development of the curriculum reflects two 
components: a structural framework, which provides 
the skeleton for the curriculum, and a conceptual 
framework, which provides a unifying theme for 
organizing theoretical content for nursing and cognate 
courses, as well as for understanding the process of 
nursing. 

Structural Framework 

The structural framework of the curriculum rests on 
three major assumptions: 

1 . The upper division of a baccalaureate program 
in nursing provides the specialized theoretical 
knowledge upon which professional nursing prac- 
tice rests. 

2. A clinical experience core provides the opportunity 
to develop proficiency in exercise of clinical judg- 
ment and skills essential to professional nursing 
practice. 

3. Baccalaureate programs prepare nurses who can 
assume roles (practice) as interdependent practi- 
tioners in a variety of health care settings. 

The curriculum, a sixty-credit upper-division nursing 
major, consists of nursing and cognate courses and a 
clinical experience core. The upper-division courses 
in biological and psychosocial sciences focus on the 
level and type of information that is essential to pro- 
vide theoretical understanding of the biological and 
psychosocial functions that reflect the adapting hu- 
man organism. Upper-division courses in nursing 
provide an additional knowledge base essential for 
nursing theory and practice. 

Throughout the curriculum, there is an emphasis 
upon the scientific mode of inquiry Professional 
practitioners of nursing require more than the mastery 
of a particular body of professional information or a 
cluster of technical skills. They need intellectual 
leverage for continued learning, for modifying prac- 
tice, and for understanding the social forces that 
facilitate or impede their ability to function effectively 
in their personal and professional life. 

Since nursing is an applied science, the ability in a 
given situation to exercise clinical judgment and skill 
is critical. The clinical experience core provides the 
opportunity to develop proficiency in the coordination 
of knowledge and skills essential for nursing practice. 
The focus is on nursing functions: on assessment and 
problem-related intervention through health counsel- 
ing, health education, preventive, restorative, and 
therapeutic measures. 

Each clinical nursing course is planned so that, within 
the course and within the sequence of courses, under- 
standing of and skill in the nursing process develop 
as a continuum. The programs are planned so that the 
student moves from the less complex situation to those 
that test his or her ability to provide leadership in the 
delivery of nursing care services: to function in a 
collegial relationship with other members of the 



health team; and to appreciate the emerging roles of 
professional nurses. 

In the first semester the focus of the nursing major 
is on introducing the profession of nursing, the nursing 
process, the acquisition of skills in communication, 
and selected basic nursing skills. The student then 
progresses to the study of concepts of psychosocial 
needs and problems, and the physiological alterations 
of body processes of adult patients with representative 
acute medical-surgical health problems. At the end 
of the first semester the student has the option to 
register for either community nursing or parent-child 
nursing. This option exists as long as space remains in 
the chosen course at the time of registration. 

The content of the parent-child course considers the 
needs of the mother, father, and child within the 
family group. It deals with theory and practice req- 
uisite to the health needs of women and children, 
relating this theory and practice to social trends and 
family influences. Normal growth and development are 
integrated throughout the course and experiences 
are provided for the promotion and maintenance of 
optimal health to families in a variety of settings. 

In community health the focus is on aspects of pre- 
vention and intervention in selected health problems, 
including mental health. The common denominator 
used in teaching is the epidemiological approach. 
Experience is provided for the students to observe 
and participate in the dynamics of group process. 

Before registering for the final nursing course, all 
students must complete a course in assessment of 
health status. The nursing course of the final semester 
focuses on caring for patients with multiple and com- 
plex nursing needs; having responsibility for nursing 
care of groups of patients; and participating in the 
leadership activities related to nursing care. The 
clinical experience of this semester may be in either 
a hospital or community agency. With guidance the 
student participates in selecting the agency for his or 
her final experience. 

Pharmacology, nutrition, and diet therapy are in- 
cluded within the structure of all of the nursing courses 
of the curriculum 

The biological science and professionally related 
courses are offered concurrently with the nursing 
courses. Courses in the biological sciences correlate 
the sequential development of basic concepts and 
theories with the requirements of the various clinical 
courses. The student selects the sequence of the re- 
maining professionally related courses 

Conceptual Framework 

Content and process are two dimensions central to 
the development of the conceptual framework. They 
are complementary components which are viewed in 
the context of a dynamic relationship. The approach 
to the selection of content for the curriculum is through 
the delineation of essential concepts. Essential con- 
cepts are derived from general systems theory and the 
basic sciences. This approach provides a structure 
within which nursing knowledge can be synthesized. 
Likewise, this approach allows students and faculty 
the opportunity to test general propositions (infer- 



Program of Study 11 



ences) for validity and reliability within the context 
of selected phenomena in the practice setting The 
premise is that although a concept may remain a con- 
stant element within the curriculum, the theoretical 
basis for the concept is constantly being altered 
through additional empirical evidence in nursing prac- 
tice or through advances in science and technology. 
Delineation of these essential concepts also provides 
a structure within which nursing practice can be 
analyzed 



Organization of the Curriculum for the 
Registered Nurse 

The organization of the curriculum of the baccalaure- 
ate degree program for registered nurses (graduates 
of hospital diploma and associate degree programs) is 
similar to the program for college graduates and like- 
wise reflects two components: a structural framework, 
which provides the skeleton for the curriculum, and a 
conceptual framework, which provides a unifying 
theme for organizing theoretical content for nursing 
and cognate courses, as well as for understanding 
the process of nursing 

Structural Framework 

Candidates who have successfully completed the 
prerequisite admission requirements of sixty credits 
of general education courses, successful achievement 
in the New York State College Proficiency Examina- 
tion, and successful achievement on the Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 
Clinical Proficiency Examination are considered for 
admission to the program. The assumptions for the 
structural framework of the curriculum are similar 
to those of the curriculum for college graduates. 

The curriculum is a thirty-credit upper-division nursing 
major consisting of nursing and cognate courses and 
a clinical experience core. In the instance of graduate 
nurse students, the assumptions reflect validation of 
previous education and experience in nursing. The 
upper-division courses in biological and psychosocial 
sciences focus on the level and type of information 
that is essential to provide theoretical understanding 
of the biological and psychosocial functions that 
reflect the adapting human organism. 

Conceptual Framework 

In this curriculum, the clinical nursing core, or the 
study of the practice of nursing, will focus on the 
process of nursing as a system-oriented process in 
the three domains of primary, acute, and long-term 
care. The clinical experience core provides the struc- 
ture for preparation of interdependent practitioners 
Associated seminars serve as a mode for extending 
the scope of knowledge and experience and for de- 
veloping professional peer communication and 
decision-making skills. 



Program of Study for 
College Graduates 

College graduates must earn sixty credits in the School 
of Nursing to be eligible for the degree in nursing. In 



general, students registered for full-time study are 
advised to carry 1 5 to 1 6 credits per semester 

The following 47 credits are required for the degree 

Course Credits 

Nursing 156 10 

Nursing 157 10 

Nursing 256 10 

Nursing 257 12 

Nursing 160 1 

Nursing 360 2 

Social Science 207 2 



In addition, a minimum of 6 credits of biological 
science courses are required for the degree. 



Course 

Biological Science 133* 
Biological Science 134 
Biological Science 136 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 



* Required unless exempted by appropriate examina- 
tion approved by the School of Nursing 

A minimum of 7 additional credits of professionally 
related courses are required for the degree. 

Course Credits 

Growth and Development 

(2 credits required from among a group 

of courses to be offered) 
Social Science 108-Research* 2 

Pharmacology 140 2 

Epidemiology 247 2 

Spanish for Professionals 2 

A student may elect either Guided Study or Indepen- 
dent Study with the approval of the appropriate 
committee. 

* Required unless exempted by appropriate examina- 
tion approved by the School of Nursing. 

Program of Study 
for Registered Nurses 

Registered nurses must earn thirty credits in the 
School of Nursing after completing the prerequisites 
for admission to the degree program. In general, 
registered nurses are part-time students and so are 
advised to select their courses carefully before regis- 
tering each semester. 

The following program of study is recommended for 
registered nurses. 



First semester 
Biological Science 133 
Growth and Development 
Social Science 207 

Second semester 
Biological Science 136 
Growth and Development 
Epidemiology 247 

Third semester 
Nursing 360 
Nursing 365 or 366 
Pharmacology 140 



Credits 
3 
2 
2 



Admission 13 



Fourth semester Credits 

Nursing 367 5 

Social Science 108 2 



Admission 

General Requirements 

The number of qualified applicants exceeds the 
number of students that can be admitted to the pro- 
grams of the nursing major each year Applicants 
selected will be those who, in competition with others 
seeking admission at the same time, have demon- 
strated by their qualifications that they are well fitted 
for the nursing profession 

Evaluation of the candidate's ability to profit from the 
instruction at the School of Nursing is based on sec- 
ondary school and college records, the recommenda- 
tions of school authorities, and the results of 
standardized achievement tests. Evidence of the 
candidate's ability to make effective use of free time 
and capacity for leadership and concern for others is 
given due consideration. Evaluations are also made 
on the basis of extracurricular activities, references, 
and an interview. Interviews are granted only to those 
applicants meeting certain minimum admission 
standards A favorable disposition on a student's 
application cannot be made unless the student attends 
a personal interview at the School of Nursing. An 
extensive medical report is required because of the 
nature of the professional program. 

College graduates already enrolled in the nursing 
major of another college or university may request 
the evaluation of their college records for possible 
transfer to the School at Cornell 

It is the policy of Cornell University actively to support 
equality of educational opportunity. No student shall 
be denied admission to the University or be discrim- 
inated against otherwise because of race, color, 
creed, religion, national or ethnic origin, or sex. 

Specific Requirements for the Baccalaureate 
Degree Program for Registered Nurses 

Registered nurses who are employed by The New York 
Hospital-Cornell Medical Center or an affiliating 
agency or have earned a certificate from the Division 
of Continuing Education of the School of Nursing may 
be considered for admission to this program of the 
nursing major Each applicant must complete a mini- 
mum of sixty semester hours of general education 
courses at any university, college, or junior college 
accredited by one of the regional associations of col- 
leges and secondary schools Applicants are allowed 
to transfer up to fifteen credits of general education 
courses from the New York State College Proficiency 
Subject Examinations (CPE) and/or the College Level 
Examination Program Subject Examinations (CLEP) 

Upon completion of forty-five semester hours of 
credits, including the required courses in the natural 
and social sciences, applicants may register for se- 
lected courses in the professional major as non- 
matriculated students while concurrently completing 
the sixty-credit requirement. 



Applicants to this program are required to take the 
NLN Pre-Nursmg and Guidance Examination, The 
University of the State of New York College Pro- 
ficiency Examinations, Baccalaureate Level, in Adult 
Nursing, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing, and 
Maternal-Child Nursing, and the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing Clinical Pro- 
ficiency Examination The NLN Pre-Nursmg and 
Guidance Examination and the New York State 
College Proficiency Examinations in Nursing must 
have been taken no more than five years prior to the 
individual's anticipated year of enrollment. These 
results must be received at the School by the deadline 
for filing the formal application for admission in order 
to be available for review by the Admissions Office. 

Thirty credits by examination will be granted for 
satisfactory performance in the New York State Col- 
lege Proficiency Examinations and the Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing Clinical 
Proficiency Examination 

The following distribution of general education 
courses is required for admission: 

Communications. 6 credits: composition, public 
speaking, or speech. 

Humanities, 20-30 credits: art, language, literature, 
music, philosophy, religion. No credit will be granted 
for studio humanities courses, such as painting, 
ceramics, voice, etc. 

Natural science and mathematics. 1 2 credits: general 
biology or an acceptable substitute (4 credits) and 
general chemistry (4 credits) are required. Transfer 
credit will not be granted for science courses with an 
ecological or sociological approach or for a "D" grade 
in the natural sciences. Any applicant who completed 
a general biology course before 1 964 may be required 
to take a challenge examination in biology or take a 
biology course before admission to fulfill the general 
biology requirement. 

Social science and history, 1 2-22 credits: sociology 
(3 credits required), psychology (3 credits required), 
political science, anthropology, economics, history, 
geography. Transfer credit will not be granted for a 
"D" grade in the required sociology and psychology 
courses 

Individuals who plan to submit proficiency examina- 
tion results in any of the four required subject areas 
of biology, chemistry, psychology, and sociology must 
have taken the examinations no more than five years 
prior to the anticipated year of enrollment. 

Specific Requirements for the College Graduate 

Persons who hold or are to be awarded a baccalaureate 
degree by an accredited senior college or university 
may be considered for admission to this program of 
the nursing major Applicants will be required to take 
the Graduate Record Examination 

The following distribution of courses is required for 
admission to the Program for College Graduates 

Humanities. 1 credits. 

Social science. 10 credits sociology (3 credits re- 
quired), psychology (3 credits required) Transfer 



14 Grades and Academic Standing 



credit will not be granted for a "D" grade in the 
required sociology and psychology courses. 

Natural science and mathematics, 8 credits: general 
biology or an acceptable substitute (4 credits) and 
general chemistry (4 credits) are required. Transfer 
credit will not be granted for science courses with an 
ecological or sociological approach or for a "D" grade 
in the natural sciences. Any applicant who completed 
a general biology course before 1 964 may be required 
to take a challenge examination in biology or take a 
biology course before admission to fulfill the general 
biology requirement. 

Those college graduates who have not yet completed 
the required science or social science courses may 
fulfill any or all of these requirements by taking a 
New York State College Proficiency Subject Examina- 
tion (CPE) or a College Level Examination Program 
Subject Examination (CLEP) in biology, chemistry, 
psychology, or sociology. 

Individuals who plan to submit proficiency examina- 
tion results in any of these subjects must have taken 
the examinations no more than five years prior to the 
anticipated year of enrollment. 



Applications 

Prospective students should write the Office of Ad- 
missions, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 515 East 71 Street, New York, 
New York 1 0021 , for forms to be used in making 
application for admission. 

Important Dates 

For College Graduates 

The following information and dates apply for 
applicants to the Program for College Graduates. 
Requests for applications may be made any time after 
May 1, 1976 for admission in September 1977. 

Admissions applications are due by October 1, 1976 
for early review and by January 1 , 1 977 for regular 
review. Applications will be released and accepted 
after January 1 , if places remain to be filled. 

Early review decisions are announced by January 1 . 
Though all qualified applicants who have completed 
their applications by October 1 will be interviewed 
in the fall, only those meeting the criteria for early 
review will receive their admissions decision by 
January 1 . 

Decisions made by regular review are announced in 
March and April. Applications submitted after January 
1 will be acted upon as they are completed. Those 
applicants who do not qualify for the program will be 
notified once their application has been reviewed. 

Each applicant accepted by regular review must 
advise the School of his or her decision regarding 
admission within two weeks of acceptance. Upon 
acceptance, early review applicants will be advised of 
the date their decision is due. 

For Registered Nurses 

The following information and dates apply for regis- 
tered nurse applicants. A preliminary application may 



be filed at any time. (No fee is required.) This entitles 
the applicant to advisement relative to planning a 
program of study to meet the general education 
requirements. The formal application for admission 
should be filed by applicants who have earned at 
least forty-five of the required sixty general education 
credits. 

The application and all accompanying forms must be 
received by April 1 for the fall semester and October 1 
for the spring semester. Applicants will be notified 
about their admission status by July 1 for the fall 
semester and January 1 for the spring semester. 

For All Applicants 

The Financial Assistance Application must be filed 
by February 1 5. Decisions are announced May 1 . 
Offers must be accepted within three weeks of receipt. 

Visits to the School 

Members of the staff are available to meet with pro- 
spective applicants to discuss the School's admission 
requirements, application procedures, and the appro- 
priateness of the applicant's general education in 
satisfying the requirements for admission. Appoint- 
ments for these visits are required. Prospective 
applicants are asked to call the Admissions Office 
to schedule an appointment. 

An informational visit does not take the place of the 
required interview, which is scheduled after applica- 
tion materials have been submitted and reviewed. 



Grades and Academic 
Standing 

The Academic Standards Committee, composed of 
faculty representing the programs of the curriculum 
and the dean or her representative, meets at least two 
times each year to review the academic records of 
students in the School. The committee is responsible 
for reviewing the records of students whose cumulative 
average does not meet minimal standards, whose 
cumulative average has dropped seriously since the 
previous semester, or students whose performance in 
the major nursing course is below the acceptable level 
of achievement. 

The committee recommends to the faculty the candi- 
dates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nurs- 
ing. The committee acts on the records of those stu- 
dents who qualify for the Dean's List and those who 
are to be considered for graduation with distinction. 

The grading system is based on a 4.0 scale as follows: 
4.0-3.5 (100-90% = A), excellent to very good; 
3.4-2.5 (89-80% = B), good; 2.4-1 5 (79-70% = C), 
satisfactory; 1 .4-0.5 (69-60% = D), below acceptable 
level; 0.4-0.0 (below 60% = F), failing. 

S and U Grades: Final grades of S (satisfactory) and U 
(unsatisfactory) are reported for most clinical labora- 
tory courses and for a limited number of other courses. 
A grade of S in clinical laboratory courses is equivalent 
to 2.0 or higher; a grade of U means failing. For other 
courses, a grade of S is equivalent to 1 .5 or higher and 
a grade of U to 1 .4 or lower. The specified course 



Degree Requirements 15 



credit will be given for grades of S; no credit will be 
given for grades of U. S and U grades have no numeri- 
cal value and are not used in computing grade point 
averages. 

Incomplete Grades: An incomplete (INC) is a tempo- 
rary grade. It is given only when students are unable 
to complete all the requirements for a course because 
of illness and/or prolonged absence due to circum- 
stances beyond their control. 

Students who receive an incomplete in a course are 
required to complete the course work within one year 
after the grade is recorded or the grade will be changed 
to a U. If the incomplete is in a course that is prerequi- 
site to another course, the student must complete the 
required work before registering for the subsequent 
course. 

The faculty may grant approval for a student to repeat 
a course and/or a full semester if, for acceptable 
reasons, the student's achievement was below the 
School's expected level. In such instances, the first 
grade(s) will not appear on the official records. Nota- 
tions to this effect will be entered on the back of the 
transcript but will under no circumstances be disclosed. 

Notice of Grades: Grades are issued directly to the 
students at the end of each semester. Parents and 
guardians may be notified when a student is asked to 
withdraw from the School. 

Exemption of Courses: College graduates who wish 
to obtain credit by examination for the introductory 
biological science or social science course must file an 
application with the Office of Records at least sixty 
days before the expected official date of enrollment 
in the course. The student will be notified of the date, 
time, and place of examination by the Office of Rec- 
ords. The examination must be taken at least two 
weeks before expected enrollment in the course. Upon 
successful completion of the examination, the tran- 
script will show the course and credits earned by 
examination. 

Students who earn credit for a course by examination 
may, with the permission of the faculty member re- 
sponsible for the course, attend selected lectures if 
there has been evidence of limited recall in a particular 
area of content. 

Auditing Courses: Students who wish to audit a course 
by regular attendance with the privilege of partici- 
pating in class discussions and obtaining all course 
materials may do so by making formal application to 
the Office of Records. Courses with limited enrollment, 
laboratory courses (clinical and science), and seminar 
courses will not be open to auditors. An audited course 
will not appear on a student's record. 

Changes in Programs of Study: Students may change 
their registration for elective courses during the one 
week change-of-program period at the beginning of 
each semester. A Change of Program Request form 
signed by the student's adviser must be filed in the 
Office of Records by the second Tuesday of the fall 
semester and the second Monday of the spring semes- 
ter Students will be notified of the action on their 
request by the Office of Records. Requests to add 
courses will be honored within the enrollment limita- 
tions of the course. 



Academic Standing 

In order to be in good standing for a semester, a 
student must: (1 ) attain a grade of 2.0 or better in 
nursing theory, 1 .5 or better in related courses, and S 
in clinical laboratory courses; and (2) have a minimal 
cumulative average (MCA ) for the semester as 
follows: first semester, 1.6; second semester, 1.76; 
third semester, 1 .82; and fourth semester, 1 83 

Students whose grades or averages fall below these 
levels at midsemester and/or end of semester will be 
placed on academic warning by the Office of the Dean. 
A student may remain on academic warning for only 
one semester. If the conditions of the warning have not 
been removed by the end of the next semester, the 
student will be required to withdraw from the School 
of Nursing. 

Students who have met all of the admission require- 
ments are classified as matriculants. Students who 
have not yet met all the admission requirements are 
considered nonmatnculants. Nonmatriculant students 
will be notified when they have achieved matriculant 
status by the director of admissions. 

Dean's List 

Students who attain a semester average of 3.50 with- 
out any grades below 1 .5 or U grades and have com- 
pleted all of the required course work by the end of 
the semester are eligible for the Dean's List. Only 
students who are enrolled as full-time students and 
have achieved matriculant status are eligible for the 
Dean's List. The Dean's List will be posted by the 
Office of Records. 

Dismissal 

The faculty of the School of Nursing reserves the 
privilege of retaining only those students who in their 
judgment demonstrate satisfactory progress towards 
the degree, meeting the requirements of scholarship, 
mental and physical health, and personal attributes 
considered suitable for professional nursing practice. 
Students whose suitability for nursing is questioned 
may be asked to withdraw from the School. 

Withdrawal 

A student may withdraw from the School at any time. 
The designation of withdrawal in good standing will 
be recorded if the student's academic and personal 
performance is in accord with the standards of the 
School and the financial record has been cleared A 
student who plans to withdraw must notify the Office 
of Records and discuss the reason for leaving with 
the dean. 



Degree Requirements 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is con- 
ferred by Cornell University upon recommendation of 
the faculty of the School of Nursing. In order to qualify 
for the degree, the candidate must have attained the 
required cumulative average for the total program and 
have completed satisfactorily all theory and clinical 



Expenses 17 



laboratory courses outlined in this Announcement 
and/or required by decision of the faculty 

Registered nurses must complete thirty required 
credits in the School of Nursing to be eligible for the 
degree. College graduates must complete a minimum 
of sixty required credits in the School of Nursing to 
be eligible for the degree. 

Bachelor of Science with Distinction 

Effective with the Class of 1978. candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing with distinc- 
tion must fall within the top 1 5 percent of the gradu- 
ating class. To be eligible for this honor, a student may 
not have been on academic warning for any reason 
while at the School of Nursing and must have adhered 
to professional and ethical standards of behavior. 
In addition, the registered nurse students must have 
achieved a grade of "B" on all required New York State 
College Proficiency Examinations in nursing to be 
eligible for consideration. 

Sigma Theta Tau 

In 1968 the School received a charter for the Alpha 
Upsilon chapter of Sigma Theta Tau. the National 
Honor Society of Nursing. The purposes of the society 
are to recognize the achievement of scholarship of 
superior quality, to promote the development of leader- 
ship qualities, and to encourage creative work while 
fostering high professional ideals. It is hoped that the 
commitment of the individual to the ideals and pur- 
poses of professional nursing will be strengthened by 
participation in the honor society. 

Students who have completed at least one-half of the 
nursing major, and have a minimum grade point 
average of 3.0. are considered for induction into 
Alpha Upsilon chapter. In addition to demonstrated 
superior scholastic achievement, a candidate also 
must give evidence of professional leadership poten- 
tial. 



Eligibility for State Registration 

Graduates of the generic program are eligible for 
admission to the licensing examination in all states. 
Since states require a nurse to be licensed in order to 
practice nursing, each graduate is expected to take the 
first licensing examination that is administered 
following completion of the program. Students should 
carefully consider the licensure rules of the state in 
which they plan to practice and the licensure require- 
ments of their employer when deciding where to take 
the examination. Satisfactory performance on the 
licensing examination results in state registration of 
the license and the designation of Registered Nurse. 



Expenses 



The costs of attending the School of Nursing fall into 
two general categories. The first category includes 
certain fixed charges for tuition, fees, and charges 
for services provided by the School The second cate- 
gory includes living costs and items of personal 



expense To help students prepare their individual 
budgets an estimated budget is published Although 
expenses, excluding fixed fees, vary for the individual 
student, the estimated budget reflects the usual ex- 
penses for single, full-time students living in Univer- 
sity housing 

Estimated expenses for the academic year include: 

Item Amount 

'Tuition $2600 

Books and supplies (first year) 350 

(second year) 200 

Uniform supplies (first year) 200 

Special course fees 50 

Transportation (clinical experience) 100 

Housing 1500 

Food and maintenance 1000 

"Health insurance 200 

Incidental expenses 500 

* Tuition: A semester of full-time study consists of 
12-18 credit hours of course work. This may be any 
combination of required, elective, or audited courses. 
The full tuition will be charged and there will be no 
prorated refund for courses dropped or exempted; nor 
will there be an additional charge for electives added 
within this number of credit hours. 

A semester of part-time study consists of eleven or 
fewer credit hours of course work. This may be any 
combination of required and elective courses. The 
maximum number of credits to be taken by an in- 
dividual registered for part-time study will be by 
advisement. Tuition of $85 per credit hour will be 
charged. 

** Health insurance: Each student is required to be 
enrolled in a health insurance plan. An associated 
hospital plan is available to all students in the Medical 
Center. Students will be exempt from enrollment in 
the Center plan if they give evidence of carrying com- 
parable health insurance and sign a waiver to that 
effect at the time of admission and every semester 
thereafter while registered in the School. Students 
enrolled in the plan available at the Medical Center 
will be billed each semester. These charges will appear 
as a separate item on the bill and will reflect the cur- 
rent insurance rates. Questions concerning waivers 
or billing should be discussed with the assistant to the 
dean on S 10. 



Fees 

Application Fee. (For applicants registered in a 
general education program.) A fee of $20 must ac- 
company the application for first admission 

Transfer Fee. (For applicants registered in a bac- 
calaureate nursing program.) A fee of $25 is charged 
to evaluate the record of a student already registered 
in a baccalaureate nursing program who wishes to 
apply for transfer to the School. 

Reinstatement Fee. (For students previously regis- 
tered in the School) A fee of $10 will be charged to 
evaluate the record of a former student seeking to 
reregister in the School 



18 Financial Assistance 



Acceptance Fee. A nonrefundable deposit of $50 is 
required of every student upon acceptance for ad- 
mission to the University; when the student first 
registers, it is used to cover matriculation costs. The 
deposit does not apply to the first semester's tuition 
and fees. 

Late Registration Fee. A fee of $5 is charged to 
each late registrant. First-semester registration closes 
at 5 p.m. on September 3, 1 976. Second-semester 
registration closes at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 28, 
1977. 



Special Fees 

Exemption Examination Fee. 

exemption examination is $15. 



The usual fee for an 



Fee for Auditing a Course. There will be no charge 
for full-time students. Part-time students will be 
charged $45 for the privilege of receiving the course 
outline, the bibliography, and attending selected 
classes. 

Course Fees 

Certain nonrefundable fees are charged during the 
semester in which a student is registered for the desig- 
nated course. (See course fee schedule on this page.) 
This fee covers the use of school equipment and sup- 
plies necessary for meeting the objectives of the course. 
In certain instances there will be an additional charge 
for items lost or damaged. 



ticipated unless the student voluntarily leaves the 
School during the course of a semester. In this case, a 
proportionate amount of the grant, not to exceed one- 
half, is to be reimbursed. 

In order for a student to remain in good standing, 
receive an honorable withdrawal from the School, or 
participate in the commencement exercises, all bills 
must be paid and satisfactory arrangements made for 
the future repayment of loans. Any student who regis- 
ters for a semester and then withdraws before the 
semester bill is paid must make a satisfactory settle- 
ment of tuition and fees due before the withdrawal 
form can be signed. 

A student completes arrangements for a loan autho- 
rized by the School by signing a note and receiving the 
check during the registration period. The proceeds of 
a loan must be applied to the balance due on School 
charges. They may not be claimed as a credit on the 
bill. 

New York State tuition assistance awards may not be 
claimed as an exemption from the tuition bill since 
the state prepares individual checks, that are payable 
to the student, and sends them to the School for dis- 
tribution. Checks for these awards will not be available 
at the time tuition and fees are due. When an extension 
of time for payment of part or all of the tuition and 
fees is granted, based on a New York State award, it 
is with the understanding that should the state for any 
reason fail to prepare a check for the amount of the 
award, the student is personally responsible for the 
amount due. 



Payment of Bills 

Bills for fixed charges are distributed approximately 
two weeks prior to each semester. The bill is due and 
payable the first day of each semester, unless special 
arrangements have been made with the School. The 
amount, time, and manner of payment of tuition, fees, 
or other charges may be changed at any time without 
notice. Students who have questions regarding their 
bills or the payment of grants or loans should see the 
assistant to the dean on S 1 0. 

Provision is made for the payment of bills during the 
registration period at the beginning of each semester 
Financial assistance awarded by the School, except 
loans, will be applied directly to the fixed charges. No 
reimbursement of assistance offered as a grant is an- 



Refunds 

Part of the tuition will be refunded to students who of- 
ficially withdraw during the first half of the semester. ■ 
The refund will be based on a deduction of 1 percent 
a week on all charges as of the first day of the semes- 
ter. No refund will be made after the midsemester. 



Financial Assistance 

In general, students plan to meet the cost of their 
education through self-help (loans and employment). 
To the extent that is possible, parents and spouse are 
expected to contribute to the cost of a student's 
education 



Course Fee Schedule 



Course 


Nonrefundable lee 


N 156 


$25 


N 157 


$ 5 


N 256 


$ 5 


N 257 


Charges depend on selection of 




final clinical experience 


N 360 


$10 


N 365 or N 366 


$ 5 


N 367 


$ 5 


Epidemiology 


$ 8 



Additional charges for loss or damage 

none 

Denver developmental kits 

Sphygmomanometer and Cuff 

Supplies in public health bag 

Charges depend on selection of final 

clinical experience 

Assessment bag and any part of 

contents 

none 

none 

none 



' 



Financial Assistance 19 



The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing participates in the College Scholarship Service 
(CSS) of the College Entrance Examination Board 
Participants in CSS subscribe to the principle that the 
amount of financial assistance granted a student 
should be based upon financial need. The CSS assists 
colleges and universities and other agencies in deter- 
mining the student's need for financial assistance 
Each entering student who seeks financial assistance 
is required to submit a copy of the appropriate Con- 
fidential Statement form to the College Scholarship 
Service by February 15, designating Cornell Univer- 
sity-New York Hospital School of Nursing as one of 
the recipients The Confidential Statement should be 
obtained from the School of Nursing. 

Financial assistance is offered to matriculated stu- 
dents, usually as a combination of scholarship or 
grant and loan. The scholarships and grants adminis- 
tered by the School are described below. These are 
assigned on the basis of need rather than academic 
rating 

Loans may be available from a fund established 
jointly by the School and the federal government. No 
more than $2,500 may be borrowed by a student 
during an academic year The amount of the loan 
awarded to an eligible student is dependent upon the 
total amount of federal funding made available to the 
School To be eligible for either a grant or a loan, a 
student must intend to be matriculated and enrolled 
at least half-time and demonstrate the need for fi- 
nancial assistance In addition, the student must be 
a citizen or national of the United States, or have 
immigration status and personal plans to justify the 
conclusion that he or she intends to become a perma- 
nent resident of the United States. 

Application for Financial Assistance 

Entering students who will need financial assistance 
should return the Financial Assistance Application 
with their application forms by February 15 These 
will be forwarded to the chairperson of the Financial 
Assistance Committee The Confidential Statement 
should be filed through the College Scholarship Service 
by February 15 of the year the applicant anticipates 
admission to the School of Nursing 

Students enrolled in the School who expect to register 
for the next academic year and who anticipate the 
need for financial assistance, should complete their 
applications by February 15 Students receiving 
financial assistance may arrange an interview with 
the chairperson of the committee during the fall se- 
mester to review their awards All students, whether 
receiving financial assistance or not, whose financial 
situations change during an academic year, should feel 
free to discuss their problems with the chairperson 
of the committee 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by the School 

Vivian B. Allen Scholarship Fund. Established as 
an endowed fund by gifts from the Vivian B Allen 
Foundation. Inc , income from which is used to provide 
scholarship aid annually for one or more students in 
need of financial assistance 



Allstate Foundation Grant. A grant is made 
available to the School each year to assist a student 
throughout the program 

Juliette E. Blohme Scholarship Fund. Established 
as an endowed fund by Dr and Mrs George H Van 
Emburgh as a memorial to Juliette E Blohme of the 
class of 1922 through a gift of $6,000, the interest on 
which may be used in whole or in part each year 

Fund of the Committee for Scholarships. A fund, 
established and maintained by a committee of women 
interested in the School of Nursing, to assist students 
who need financial help in order to prepare for nursing 
Awards from the fund are made to entering students 
and to students enrolled in the School 

Davison/Foreman Foundation Grant. Grants from 
this foundation are allocated in the spring semester 
for the education of women working for a college de- 
gree The awards are made to students enrolled in the 
School 

Samuel J. Moritz Scholarship Fund. Established 
in 1960 as a memorial to Samuel J Moritz. and 
made possible by a gift from Edward Moritz and 
LeRoy Moses, executors of his estate. The income 
provides scholarship aid annually to one or more stu- 
dents in need of financial assistance 

Helena Rubinstein Foundation, Inc. Grant. 

Grants from this foundation are made available to the 
School and administered to students who have demon- 
strated need for financial assistance 

The Switzer Foundation Grant. A grant of $2,500 
is made available to the School each year. This grant 
is intended to assist students who are American citi- 
zens living within fifty miles of New York City and who 
have financial need 

Tudor Foundation Student Loan Fund. A loan fund 
established by the foundation and administered by the 
School to assist students in need of aid who hold 
scholarships or grants to defray the cost of tuition and 
who need further financial assistance to enable them 
to attend the School Loans from the fund are not to 
exceed $1 ,000 to any one student in any one school 
year 

The Christian C Yegen Scholarship Fund. Estab- 
lished in the spring of 1 965 as a memorial to Mr 
Christian C Yegen, father of an alumna of the Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by Outside Sources 

New York State Regents Scholarships, 
Grants, and Loans 

The following assistance is available for residents of 
New York State 

Tuition Assistance Program. Grants up to $1 .400 
yearly depending on need and tuition paid, with a 
minimum yearly grant of $100 For those students 



20 General Information 



who demonstrate a capacity to pursue a degree and 
plan to attend college, and to those who are presently 
in college and maintain satisfactory academic per- 
formance. 

For more information on these awards, write to the 
New York State Higher Education Services Corpora- 
tion, Tower Buildings, Empire State Plaza, Albany, 
New York 1 2223. 

New York Higher Education Assistance Corpora- 
tion sponsors a program through which students may 
obtain loans from local savings banks. 



Students living a distance from the School should 
consider the time to be spent in commuting each day. 
Classes and clinical experience may be scheduled 
Monday through Saturday in a combination of hours 
that may begin as early as 7:30 a.m. and end as late 
as 9:00 p.m. 

All students must keep the Office of Records informed 
of their correct address and telephone number. The 
Student Handbook outlines the system used for dis- 
tribution of official School communications to students. 
Each student is expected to follow the procedure to 
avoid delay in responding to the communications. 



General Information 

School Organization 

All matriculated students are members of the Student 
Organization. The functions of the organization are 
to contribute to the development of the professional 
education of the individual student through coopera- 
tion with the medical community and to provide an 
all-inclusive organization through which student 
concerns may be voiced and resolved. 

The Student Senate represents the Student Organiza- 
tion in determining and administering policy. Its aims 
are to coordinate and supervise the activities of the 
standing committees, to promote awareness of and 
involvement in the growth of the nursing profession, 
and to act as a channel of communication for the stu- 
dents within the academic nursing community and the 
broader medical community. 



Housing 

Facilities 

Students attending the School of Nursing may live in 
University housing or select their own living facili- 
ties within the community. Applications for University 
housing should be available about April 1 . 

Jacob S. Lasdon House, located at 420 East 70 Street, 
provides fully furnished, carpeted, and air-conditioned 
apartments with kitchens, dining areas, living rooms, 
and baths for both single and married nursing, medi- 
cal, and graduate students registered in Cornell Uni- 
versity. Single students may share a one- or two- 
bedroom apartment. By using the living room and the 
bedroom(s) as individual bedroom/study rooms, two 
students may share a one-bedroom apartment and 
three students may share a two-bedroom apartment. 
Four single students may share a two-bedroom apart- 
ment if two students share one bedroom. There are a 
limited number of studio apartments for married stu- 
dents. Married students without children will find the 
studio and one-bedroom apartments suitable. Married 
students with children will find the two-bedroom 
apartment more appropriate. 

Regulations 

Students signing leases for University housing must 
notify the appropriate office at least thirty days in 
advance of any move or change of roommate. 



Recreational Facilities 

Because the School believes that the education of 
young men and women today includes healthful 
social relationships, provisions have been made to 
encourage the development of such relationships in 
the life of the student. 

A social committee is responsible for a full and varied 
social calendar that includes such activities as dances, 
coffee hours, and suppers. Other activities in which 
students may participate are the yearbook and singing 
groups. The director of student relations is available 
at all times to advise students in the organization of 
discussion groups and in the planning of social and 
cultural activities. University facilities shared for 
recreation must be reserved well in advance through 
the appropriate offices as noted in the Student 
Handbook. 

Health Services 

Personnel Health Service of The New York Hospital, 
located in J-1, provides comprehensive health care 
for students enrolled in the School. This includes a 
physical examination and routine tests following the 
initial registration in the School, an ongoing immuni- 
zation program, ambulatory medical care in the out- 
patient clinics, and, when indicated, admission to 
The New York Hospital. Only matriculated full-time 
students are eligible for these services. 

Health insurance is required. At registration, each 
student must either enroll in the Blue Cross/Blue 
Shield of Greater New York plan available at the 
School or provide evidence of equivalent health in- 
surance coverage and sign a waiver. For insurance 
coverage through the School, a fee will be charged 
each semester based on the current insurance rate. 
(See Expenses p. 17.) 

Students are expected to take corrective action for any 
health problems, including dental work, before regis- 
tration in the School. Any subsequent elective proce- 
dures are to be scheduled during vacation periods. 

If, in the opinion of the Personnel Health Service 
physician, the condition of a student's physical or 
emotional health makes it unwise for the student to 
remain in the program, the School authorities may 
require the student to withdraw either temporarily 
or permanently at any time. 

Counseling Services 

The School maintains active counseling services 



Facilities for Instruction 21 



which are available to all students who need assist- 
ance, either in connection with routine matters that 
may come up in their work in the School or in connec- 
tion with special personal problems. 

The director of student relations assists students in 
every way possible in their educational, personal, and 
social adjustment, and cooperates with the faculty in 
helping students in these areas The director also helps 
students to locate those members of the staff who are 
best qualified to be of assistance in relation to the 
particular problem at hand 

Group therapy also is made available through the 
office of the director of student relations to assist 
students whose effectiveness and adjustment are im- 
paired by personal concerns 



Division of Continuing 
Education 

The Division of Continuing Education is an organized 
educational unit of the School of Nursing under the 
administration of the dean 

The division offers organized and planned presenta- 
tions of appropriate educational experiences at a 
professional level that are university oriented and 
related to the needs and purposes of the employment 
or practice situation The programs offered by the 
division have their origins in selected areas of nursing 
practice. The objectives of the programs are directed 
toward enabling registered nurses, both in practice 
and returning to practice, to update and expand their 
knowledge and skills in circumscribed areas of clinical 
nursing practice. 

A variety of special workshops and formalized training 
programs are conducted cooperatively with the Cornell 
University Medical College; the professional staffs of 
The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center; the 
Department of Health, Health Services Administration 
of the City of New York; the Visiting Nurse Service of 
New York; and other cooperating community agencies. 

Information on programs being offered, applications, 
and fees may be obtained by writing to the Division 
of Continuing Education. 515 East 71 Street, New 
York. New York. 10021 



Facilities for Instruction 

The facilities of The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center provide the setting for the major part 
of the educational program offered to students in 



both divisions of the School of Nursing. The classroom 
and office facilities for the School are located at 515 
East 71 Street In addition to the usual classroom and 
conference room facilities, there are audiovisual and 
learning laboratories for the practice of basic nursing 
skill 

In order to meet the objectives of the program, the 
School of Nursing contracts with selected voluntary 
and government agencies for additional clinical ex- 
periences It is a requirement of the program that 
each student participate in the care of patients in the 
community Representatives of various government 
and voluntary agencies plan with the faculty for 
appropriate ways to contribute to the student's knowl- 
edge of the community and the organization for 
human services. Individuals who feel it would be 
difficult to travel within some parts of the New York 
City community and to participate fully in assigned 
experiences, should give thoughtful consideration to 
this before registering in the program of the School 

The library, in the Samuel J Wood Library and Re- 
search Building at 1 300 York Avenue, is shared by the 
students and the faculties of the School of Nursing and 
the Medical College and the staff of The New York 
Hospital 

The reading room of the library is located on the first 
floor Adjoining the reading room are the sections for 
current journals, reference works, and monographs 
The book stacks and carrels are on two floors below 
the mam reading room. 1 ,600 current journals are 
received each year; the total collection has reached 
more than 100,000 volumes 

The library also is equipped with a communication 
terminal linked to a computer to provide searches of 
the medical literature. The Information and Reference 
Department receives requests for these searches 
Typing and duplicating services and. most importantly, 
a staff willing to help also are available. 

The clinical nursing departments have small libraries 
containing literature pertaining especially to the sub- 
ject matter of the department. These collections, 
interlibrary loans, and photoduplicate copies from 
other libraries, including the National Library of 
Medicine, supplement the main library. 

All students have clinical experience on the patient 
units of The New York Hospital. The Hospital com- 
prises five clinical departments— Medicine, Surgery. 
Lying-in Hospital. Pediatrics, and The Payne Whitney 
Clinic (psychiatry). Each of these units (largely self- 
contained) has facilities for inpatients and outpatients, 
and for teaching and conducting research. The Hospi- 
tal has approximately 1 ,1 00 beds and 90 clinics 







I 







— -.TO: 



Cornell University 



Description of Courses 



Nursing Courses 



All academic courses of the University are open to 
students of all races, religions, ethnic origins, ages, 
sexes, and political persuasions No requirement, 
prerequisite, device, rule, or other means shall be used 
by any employee of the University to encourage, 
establish, or maintain segregation on the basis of race, 
religion, ethnic origin, age. sex. or political persuasion 
in any academic course of the University 

156 Introduction to the Nursing Process, Care of 
the Adult Patient Fall Credit: five hours, theory; 
five hours, clinical laboratory M. Sugimoto and 
faculty 

The first unit focuses on the profession of nursing and 
the components of the nursing process Selected 
cognitive, psychomotor, and interpersonal skills are 
presented In the second unit, concepts essential to the 
care of adult patients with representative medical- 
surgical health problems are studied. Attention is given 
to the following parameters of each health problem: 
epidemiology, disease process, therapeutic regimens, 
and physical and psychosocial effects on the patient 
and family Therapeutic nutrition and pharmacology 
are correlated with the health problems. The influence 
of these factors on nursing judgements and actions is 
explored Experience in the clinical laboratory pro- 
vides opportunity to apply theoretical concepts and 
skills m caring for patients 

157 Parent-Child Nursing Fall and spring. 
Credit: five hours, theory; five hours, clinical labora- 
tory. Prerequisite: Nursing 156 Registration for this 
course is by advisement E W Haas and faculty 
Emphasis is placed on nursing assessment and inter- 
vention in relation to health needs of women, their 
children, and the role of the father. Theory and 
practice related to social trends, family influences. 
and normal growth and development are integrated 
throughout the course Experiences are provided for 
the promotion and maintenance of optimal health to 
families m a variety of settings 

160 Interpersonal Processes in Nursing Fall 
Credit: one hour Prerequisites psychology, three 
credits; sociology, three credits L Schwager 



Concepts of behavior, anxiety, socialization, dying, 
death, and grief are studied in the context of the nurse- 
patient relationship Emphasis is on principles of 
communication and interviewing The content is pre- 
requisite to subsequent nursing courses 



256 Community Health: Care of Patients with 
Environmentally Related Health Problems Fall 
and spring Credit five hours, theory; five hours, 
clinical laboratory Prerequisites Nursing 156 Regis- 
tration for this course is by advisement B H. Rosner 
and faculty. 

Focus is on the prevention and control of selected 
community health problems such as cerebral vascular 
accident, mental illness, and social problems such as 
addiction The modality of nursing care will be both 
individual (therapeutic nurse-patient relationship) 
and group (family) in acute psychiatric hospital 
settings and the community. The common denomina- 
tor utilized in teaching the selected community health 
problems will be the epidemiological approach Ex- 
perience is provided for students to observe and par- 
ticipate in group process 

257 Dimensions of Nursing Spring Credit four 
hours, theory; eight hours, clinical laboratory Pre- 
requisites: Nursing 156. 157. 256. and 360 J B 
Done and faculty 

Selected aspects of professional nurse practice are 
studied: care of patients with multiple and complex 
needs, including those with cancer; sharing responsi- 
bility for nursing care of groups of patients; and 
participating in the leadership activities related to 
nursing care. A variety of settings will be used for 
clinical learning. 

360b Assessment of Health Status of Children 

Fall, mtersession, and spring Credit two hours 
Prerequisite Biological Science 1 33, prerequisite or 
concurrent enrollment in Biological Science 136 
Required: all students not taking 360a. M Miller 
Supervised practice in techniques of observation, 
interviewing, percussion, palpation, and auscultation 
with emphasis on normal ranges of the healthy in- 
dividual The course includes relevant anatomy, 
physiology, and pathology basic to understanding the 
significance of findings Four hours of combined 
conference and practice are required each week 



24 Description of Courses 



360a Assessment of Health Status of Adults 

Summer, fall, intersession, and spring. Credit: two 
hours. Prerequisite: Biological Science 133; prerequi- 
site or concurrent enrollment in Biological Science 
136. Required: all students not taking 360b. 
Supervised practice in techniques of observation, 
interviewing, percussion, palpation, and ausculta- 
tion with emphasis on normal ranges of the healthy 
individual. The course includes relevant anatomy, 
physiology, and pathology basic to understanding 
the significance of findings. Four hours of combined 
conference and practice are required each week. 

365 Clinical Nursing— Acute Care of Children or 
Adults Fall. Credit: five hours. Prerequisite: Course 
360 must be taken prior to or concurrently with this 
course. Required course: registered nurses not taking 
Course 366. Limited enrollment and by advisement. 
B. Friedman. 

Within this clinical experience core the student has 
the opportunity to develop proficiency in the exercise 
of clinical judgment and skills requisite to the sup- 
portive management of children or adults who require 
continuous, comprehensive observation in an intensive 
or critical care environment. Opportunities are pro- 
vided for systematic study in a clinical area of interest. 
The focus is on nursing functions: assessment and 
problem-related intervention through health counsel- 
ing, health education, and preventive, restorative, and 
therapeutic measures. Associated seminars serve as 
a mode for extending the scope of knowledge and 
experience and for developing professional peer com- 
munication and decision-making skills. Fifteen hours 
of combined practice and correlated seminars are 
required each week. 

366 Clinical Nursing— Long-term or Chronic 
Illness of Children or Adults Fall Credit five 
hours. Prerequisite: Course 360 must be taken prior 
to or concurrently with this course. Required course: 
registered nurses not taking Course 365. Limited 
enrollment and by advisement. B Friedman. 

Within this clinical experience core the student has the 
opportunity to develop proficiency in the exercise of 
clinical judgment and skills requisite to the supportive 
management of children or adults with long-term or 
progressive chronic illness. Opportunities are provided 
for systematic study in a clinical area of interest. The 
focus is on nursing functions: on assessment and 
problem-related intervention through health counsel- 
ing, health education, and preventive, restorative, and 
therapeutic measures. Associated seminars serve as a 
mode for extending the scope of knowledge and ex- 
perience and for developing professional peer com- 
munication and decision-making skills. Fifteen hours 
of combined practice and correlated seminars are 
required each week. 

367 Clinical Nursing— Primary Care of Children 
or Adults Spring. Credit: five hours. Prerequisite: 
Nursing 365 or 366. Required course: registered 
nurses. Limited enrollment and by advisement. B. 
Friedman. 

Within this clinical experience core the student has 
the opportunity to develop proficiency in the initial 
screening assessment of the psychosocial and physi- 
cal status of children or adults and responsibility of the 
continuum of care of selected patients within the pro- 



tocols mutually agreed upon by medical and nursing 
personnel. Experiences offer opportunities for the rein- 
forcement or development of skills in case finding, in- 
terpretation of selected laboratory tests, health 
counseling, health teaching and techniques of sur- 
veillance and management of care for the selected 
patients (children or adults) in ambulatory care set- 
tings. Associated seminars serve as a mode for ex- 
tending the scope of knowledge and experience and 
for developing professional peer communication and 
decision-making skills. Fifteen hours of combined 
practice and correlated seminars are required each 
week. 



Professionally Related Courses 

133 Biological Science Fall and spring. Credit: 
three hours. Required course: all students unless 
exempt by approved examination. V. Stolar. 

An introduction to the fundamental mechanisms of 
human physiology. The course progresses from the 
cell to the complexities of human control systems, 
utilizing at each level of increasing complexity the 
information and principles developed previously. This 
approach is based on the theme that all phenomena 
of life are ultimately describable in terms of physical 
and chemical laws. 

134 Biological Science Fall and spring. Credit: 
three hours. Prerequisite: Biological Science 133. 
Required prior to or concurrent with Nursing 157. 
R. S. Rubenstein. 

This course includes some aspects of human repro- 
ductive physiology; male and female anatomy, sex 
steroids, birth control, and maternal physiology. Also 
covered are principles of heredity and medical genet- 
ics. There will be a survey of pathogenic microorgan- 
isms to acquaint the student with communicable 
diseases that are endemic and epidemic. 

136 Biological Science Fall and spring. Credit: 
three hours. Prerequisite: Biological Science 133. 
Required course: all students. V. Stolar. 
Morphological and functional study of the nervous 
system in man. Histology, neurotransmitters, gross 
anatomy, stimulus-response, and integrative control 
are covered. The physiology of striated, smooth, and 
cardiac muscle will be included. 

140 Pharmacology Fall and spring. Credit: two 
hours. Prerequisite: Nursing 156 or equivalent. Re- 
quired course: registered nurses; other students by 
advisement. R. Rubenstein. 

The emphasis of the course is on the basic principles 
of pharmacology. These principles are elaborated in 
discussion of drugs acting on selected physiological 
systems such as the nervous and cardiovascular. Drug 
interactions will be included. 

247 Epidemiology Fall and spring. Credit: two 
hours. Required course: registered nurses; other stu- 
dents by advisement. R. S. Rubenstein. 
Introductory course in which the meaning and scope 
of epidemiology are considered. Relevant content is 
drawn from biostatistics, microbiology, environmental 
studies, and health service administration. Particular 



Description of Courses 25 



emphasis is on scientific appraisal of the patterns of 
health and disease in society 

108 Introduction to Research Fall and spring 
Credit: two hours. Required course: all students 

E Smith and R Wieczorek 

Introduction to skills requisite to critical review of 

published research in the health field. The purpose 

of the course is to develop intelligent consumers of 

research 

109 Life-span Growth and Development, Part I 

Fall. Credit: two hours. Required course: all students 
unless exempt by school approved examination 
Faculty to be appointed. 

Study of the critical stages and periods in the life cycle 
from birth through adolescent years. Discussion of 
psychophysiological and psychosocial factors that 
produce a range of human behavior will be based on 
work of theorists such as Piaget, Sullivan, and Freud 

110 Life-span Growth and Development, Part II 

Spring. Credit: two hours. Prerequisite: 109 Life-span 
Growth and Development or by permission of instruc- 
tor Required course: all students unless exempted by 
school approved examination. 

Study of the critical stages and periods in the life cycle 
from the adolescent years through the aging years. 
The focus will continue to be on the psychophysio- 
logical and psychosocial factors that produce a range 
of human behavior and will be based on the works of 
the various behavioral theorists such as Piaget, Sulli- 
van, and Freud. 

207 Nursing in the Social Order Fall and spring 

Credit: two hours. Required course: all students. L. 

Schwager. 

The structure and function of both formal and informal 

social organizations are considered, especially as they 

influence the work of the professional nurse in the 

delivery of health services. 

Spanish for Health Professionals Spring Credit 
two hours Prerequisite: one year of Spanish or the 
equivalent and pretesting for section assignment. 
Elective. Faculty to be appointed. 
The course assists the person already familiar with 
Spanish to develop skills in conversation as it relates 
to health care services. 



Women's Health Spring Credit two hours, theory; 
one hour, clinical practicum (elective) Prerequisite: 
Nursing 157 and Biological Science 134 or its 
equivalent or permission of the instructor. Elective 
limited enrollment D Smith and R Rubinstein 
An advanced seminar course in selected topics regard- 
ing the health care of women Topics to be included 
are health maintenance for women, gynecological 
problems; adolescent services, population and epi- 
demiological approaches to identifying problem 
areas in women's health; and the influence of the 
women's movement on health care services to women 
A contract between the students and the faculty 
will be negotiated regarding the topics to be covered. 
Class participation, individual and/or group projects, 
and a paper will be required. 

Food and Nutrition for Health Spring Credit: 
two hours Prerequisite Nursing 156 or its equiva- 
lent and Biological Science 133 or its equivalent 
prior to or concurrently with this course. Elective: 
limited enrollment. D Erlander. 
A study of the multiple factors, such as culture, re- 
ligious-philosophic orientation, and health status, 
that affect food intake. Experience will be gained in 
assessing food intake with emphasis on helping indi- 
viduals sustain or alter their eating patterns to pro- 
mote quality of life. Attention will be focused on 
normal nutrition with or without modified diets. 

Independent Study Offers the student an opportu- 
nity to delineate an area of interest for guided, system- 
atic study under the sponsorship of a faculty member. 
Planned essentially for the winter intersession or 
summer session, on- or off-campus study is possible 
for credit ranging from one to four hours. S-U grades. 
Registration by indorsement of a faculty sponsor. 
D. Pearlmutter, E. Smith, R. Wieczorek, and selected 
faculty 

Guided Study Offers qualified students an oppor- 
tunity to participate in a specially designed program 
of study and course visitation under the direction of a 
faculty member. It permits participation in classes, 
seminars, conferences, library research, and selected 
nursing service programs. Offered during the regular 
term dates or in January. May be taken for credit or no 
credit. Request for attendance is filed in the Office of 
the Dean. A special fee is established after consulta- 
tion with the dean. 




*•" 



ftX" \\ 



Cornell University 



Register 



Eleanor C Lambertsen. Ed.D , D Sc (Hon ), R N , 
Senior Associate Director, Nursing Services 

Julius D'Elia. Senior Associate Director, 
Administrative Services 

Frank Ravenna, Associate Director, Financial Services 

H Henry Bertram, Associate Director, Personnel 
Services 

H Mefford Runyon, Secretary-Treasurer 

Joint Administrative Board 



University Administration 



Dale R Corson, President of the University 

David C Knapp. University Provost 

William G Herbster, Senior Vice President 

Mark Barlow. Jr., Vice Provost 

W. Donald Cooke. Vice President for Research 

June M Fessenden-Raden, Vice Provost 

William D Gurowitz. Vice President for Campus 

Affairs 
Robert T Horn. Vice President and Chief Investment 

Officer 
Samuel A Lawrence, Vice President for 

Administration 
E Hugh Luckey. Vice President for Medical Affairs 
Robed M Matyas. Vice President for Planning and 

Facilities 
Paul L McKeegan, Vice Provost 
Arthur H Peterson. University Treasurer and Chief 

Fiscal Officer 
Richard M Ramm. Vice President for Public Affairs 
Byron W Saunders, Dean of the University Faculty 
Neal R Stamp, University Counsel and Secretary of 

the Corporation 



The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center 
Administration 

E Hugh Luckey. M.D.. President 

Roger H Sheldon. Vice President for Planning 

The New York Hospital 
Administration 

David D Thompson. M D.. Director 

Anne A Cote. Assistant to the Director 

Melville A Piatt. M.D , Executive Associate Director 

Susan T Carver. M.D.. Associate Director. 

Professional Services 
Richard A Berman. Associate Director. Ambulatory 

Services 
Cosmo J LaCosta. Associate Director, General 

Services 



Representatives from the Board of 
Trustees of Cornell University 

Dale R Corson. Chairman 1976 
Arthur H Dean 
Robert W Purcell 
Harold D Uns 

Representatives from the Board of 
Governors of The Society of the 
New York Hospital 

Stanley de J. Osborne, Chairman 1 977 
Kenneth H Hannan 
Frederick K Trask, Jr 
John Hay Whitney 

Member at Large 

E Roland Harnman 

Ex Officio Member 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D. 



Officers of the School 

Dale R Corson. Ph.D.. President of the University 
David C. Knapp, Ph.D., Provost of the University 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen. Ed D . D Sc (Hon.). R.N . 

Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor of 

Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine. MA, R.N , Associate Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Helen M Berg. Ed.D . R.N, Assistant Dean 
Gloria E Wilson, MA, R.N . Assistant Dean 



Faculty and Staff 

Administration 

Eleanor C Lambertsen. Ed.D.. D Sc (Hon.). R.N . 

Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor of 

Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine. MA.RN. Associate Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Nina T Argondizzo. MA. R N . Assistant Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Helen M Berg. Ed.D.. R.N. Assistant Dean 
Gloria E Wilson. MA . R N . Assistant Dean 



28 Register 



Meimi Joki, A.B., Assistant to the Dean 
Edna Johnson, Director of Student Relations 
Judith A. Court, MA., Director of Admissions 

Undergraduate Faculty 

Eddie Mae Barnes, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing; Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney 
Psychiatric Clinic 

Mary T. Bielski, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, Baker 
Pavilion 

Marion Peters Braxton, M.P.H., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Francesca Castronovo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Sarah E. Cook, M.A., R.N., Instructor 

Margaret Cotterell, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Sister Catherine M. Cummings, M.S.N. , R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Marion Phyllis Cunningham, M.S., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Lynne J. Dawson, M.P.H., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Helen Demitroff, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Jeanne B. Dorie, MA, R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Gladys M. Dykstra, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Dorothy Ellison, MA, R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing, Clinical Nursing Department Head, 
Operating Room Nursing 

I. Darlene Erlander, M.A., R.D., Assistant Professor of 
Nutrition 

Bonnie Jones Friedman, M.S., R.N., Assistant Profes- 
sor of Nursing 

Elenora Haas, M.S., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Louise S. Hazeltine, MA, R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing; Associate Dean 

Eleanor Krohn Herrmann, M.S., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing* 

Maryann Johnston, M.Ed., R.N., Instructor in Nursing* 

Ann Keith-Kurtis, MA, R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Katherine A. Knight, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing 

Patricia A. Kosten, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 
Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of Nursing 

Martha A. McNiff, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing** 

Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing 

Agnes E. Morgan, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Diana Newman, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Deanna R. Pearlmutter, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Bernice Horner-Rosner, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Reva Scharf Rubenstein, Ph.D., Associate Professor 
of Science 

* On leave fall semester, 1 976. 
** On leave spring semester, 1977. 



Lois Schwager, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, 

Surgical Nursing 
Elisabeth Dorsey Ivey Smith, Ed.D., R.N., Associate 

Professor of Nursing 
Vera Stolar, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Science 
Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, 

Obstetrics-Gynecology and Pediatrics 
Madeleine S. Sugimoto, M.Ed., M.A., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Janet Swanson, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, Out- 
patient Department 
Rita Reis Wieczorek, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing 

Continuing Education Faculty 

Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing; Assistant Dean 
Rachel Ayers, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor, 

Memorial Division of Nursing 
Eddie Mae Barnes, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing; Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney 

Psychiatric Clinic 
Mary Bartlett, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Louise Battista, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Mary T. Bielski, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, Baker 

Pavilion Nursing Service 
Barbara Boyce, MA, R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Grace E. Brown, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Amy Chou, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Elaine Crimmins, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Edna Danielsen, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Virginia C. Dericks, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Dorothy Ellison, MA, R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, 

Operating Room Nursing 
Joanne Foster, MA, R.N., Administrative Liaison, 

Assistant Director of Nursing Service 
Geraldine K. Glass, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Alene Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Christina L. Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Mary Herbermann, R.N., Assistant in Instruction 
Alice Hugo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Patricia Jones, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Carol Keller, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Helen King, MA, R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of Nursing 
Andrea LaPorte, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Martha Leonard, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Emelia Luddy-Turner, MA, R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Patricia Mahoney, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Margery Manly, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing 
Grace Moroukian, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 



Register 29 



Margaret J O'Brien, MA. M.P.H.. R.N.. Adjunct 

Assistant Professor 
Patricia M O'Regan. M A . R N . Instructor in Nursing 
Eva M Reese. M S . R N . Ad|unct Assistant Professor 
Lena J Saffioti. M A , R N . Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Adele Schlosser. M P.H . R N , Adjunct Assistant 

Professor 
Doris Schwartz. M A , R.N.. Associate Professor of 

Nursing 
Pauline Seitz, M S , R N , Instructor in Nursing 
Carol Shanik. M S . R N . Instructor in Nursing 
Laura L Simms. Ed D . R N , Associate Professor of 
Nursing. Clinical Nursing Department Head. 
Surgical Nursing 
Marie D Strickland. M.Ed , R.N, Assistant Professor 
of Nursing, Clinical Nursing Department Head, 
Obstetncs-Gynecology and Pediatrics 
Grace Sullivan, B S N , R N . Assistant in Instruction 
Barbara Topf-Olstem. B.S.. R.N., Assistant in Instruc- 
tion 
Carolyn E Wagner, MA , R N . Assistant Professor of 
Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head. Out- 
patient Department 
Margie Warren, MA. R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Emeritus Professors 

Muriel R Carbery. M S . R.N.. Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Virginia M Dunbar. MA. R.N. Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing and Dean Emeritus 
Verda F Hickox. MA. R.N . Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Mary Klein. MA.. R.N . Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Margery T Overholser. R.N.. Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Bessie A R Parker. B.S.. R.N.. Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 
Veronica Lyons Roehner. MA, R.N., Professor Emeri- 
tus of Nursing 
Hendenka J Rynbergen. M.S.. Professor Emeritus of 

Science 



Class of 1977 

The name of the student is followed by his or her home 
address The college or university from which the 
student transferred is given in parentheses 

Program for College Graduates 

Ackley. Grama. New York. New York (Ohio University) 

Acres. Cathleen. Ann Arbor. Michigan (University of 
Michigan) 

Baiocchi. Thomas. New York. New York (Columbia 
College) 

Bennett. Pamela. Kenvil. New Jersey (Dickinson 
College) 

Beirne. Michael. New York. New York (LaSalle Col- 
lege) 

Berg. Christine. Brighton Michigan (University of 
Detroit) 

Bestak. Marlene. New York. New York (New York Uni- 
versity) 



Bittlmgmaier. Debra. Rochester. New York (Cornell 

University) 
Black, Rosemary. Davis. California (University of 

California at Los Angeles) 
Bomberg, Fay. New York. New York (Connecticut 

College) 
Bowden. Martha, Oyster Bay. New York (Lake Forest 

College) 
Braverman, Ellen, Paramus. New Jersey (Lafayette 

College) 
Brink, Katharine, Haddam, Connecticut (Lake Erie 

College) 
Brooks. Marjone. East Rockaway. New York (Cornell 

University) 
Carhart, Katherme, New York. New York (Antioch 

College) 
Carrie. Mary. Upper Montclair, New Jersey (Fairfield 

University) 
Day. Anne. New Rochelle. New York (College of New 

Rochelle) 
Delson. Eric. Bronx. New York (Hunter College) 
deWall. Babette. Massapequa Park. New York (Wells 

College) 
DuBois. Judith. Brewster. Massachusetts (University 

of Connecticut) 
Eaton. Constance, Hamburg, New York (Earlham 

College) 
Eckstein, Carol, New York. New York (Douglas Col- 
lege) 
Englander, Susan. Louisville, Kentucky (Ohio Wes- 

leyan University) 
Enckson, Carl. Glen Cove. New York (University of 

Virginia) 
Ezaki. Toshia. Allentown. Pennsylvania (Smith Col- 
lege) 
Falkowski. Melmda. Huntsville. Alabama (Hiram Col- 
lege) 
Feller. Nancy. Yonkers. New York (State University 

of New York at Bmghamton) 
Fleming. Nancy. New Hartford. New York (Cornell 

University) 
Friedman. Valerie, New York. New York (Clark Uni- 
versity) 
Glow. Heidi. Great Neck. New York (Washington 

University) 
Goldm. Sandra. Jamaica New York (University of 

Nevada) 
Gould. Marjone. Cambridge. Massachusetts (Wheaton 

College) 
Gulden, Jane. New York, New York (Montclair State 

College) 
Hall. Heather. Alexandria. Virginia (Montclair State 

College) 
Hanson Monica Nantucket, Massachusetts (Fordham 

University) 
Haran, Patricia. Elmhurst. New York (Queens College) 
Hare. Martha. Syracuse. New York (State University 

of New York at Bmghamton) 
Hart. Lois. Lake Wood. Ohio (New York Institute of 

Technology) 
Helbhng. Adnenne. New York. New York (University 

of North Carolina) 
Hernandez. Migdalia Bronx. New York (Smith Col- 
lege) 
Hoffmann Enka. Union. New Jersey (Bryn Mawr 

College) 
Horn. Bonnie. Glen Rock. New Jersey (Union College) 



30 Register 



Hurwitz, Rhea, Middletown, Connecticut (Brown 
University) 

Ingraham, Kathleen, New York, New York (St. Law- 
rence University) 

Johnson, Barbara, Wilmington, Delaware (University 
of Vermont) 

Kelly, Elizabeth, Bronxville, New York (Goddard 
College) 

Kistler, Emily, Zionsville, Pennsylvania (Sarah Law- 
rence College) 

Kramer, Emily, Teaneck, New Jersey (Simmons Col- 
lege) 

Kraus, Kathryn, Lombard, Illinois (University of 
Illinois) 

Krug, Susan, York, Pennsylvania (University of Pitts- 
burgh) 

Kuhns, Mary, West Hartford, Connecticut (Fairleigh 
Dickinson University) 

Kuipers, Emily, Grand Rapids, Michigan (Calvin Col- 
lege) 

Laufer, Amy, Holyoke,-Massachusetts (University of 
Massachusetts) 

Lehman, June, Forest Hills, New York (University of 
Wisconsin) 

Levin, Susanna, Highland Park, New Jersey (Columbia 
University) 

London, Deborah, Waltham, Massachusetts (Brandeis 
University) 

Look, Hannah, Brookline, Massachusetts (Skidmore 
College) 

Lopez, Patricia, New York, New York (Finch College) 

Luedke, Ann, Middletown, Connecticut (Smith Col- 
lege) 

McCoy, Deborah, Honolulu, Hawaii (Cornell Univer- 
sity) 

Mikelonis, Dorothy, New York, New York (Pennsyl- 
vania State University) 

Mansfield, Maureen, Flushing, New York (Fordham 
University) 

Manzo, Rosemary, Richmond Hill, New York (Mar- 
quette University) 

Marchisello, Marianne, Bayside, New York (University 
of Dayton) 

Muscio, Lorraine, New York, New York (Brooklyn 
College) 

Myers, Stephanie, Ferndale, Michigan (University of 
Michigan) 

O'Bryan, Mary, Pelham, New York (Skidmore College) 

O'Farrell, Jean, White Sulphur Springs, West Vir- 
ginia (West Virginia University) 

Orr, Deborah, Schenectady, New York (Mt. Holyoke 
College) 

Pankow, Diane, Highland Lake, New York (Boston 
* College) 

Pelissier, Ann, East Grand Rapids, Michigan (Michi- 
gan State University) 

Pennock, Maria, Lansing, Michigan (Oberlin College) 

Perkins, Sarah, Batavia, New York (University of New 
Hampshire) 

Pike, Suzanne, Needham, Massachusetts (McGill Uni- 
versity) 

Politzer, Judy, Forest Hills, New York (Cornell Uni- 
versity) 

Powers, Marcia, Pelham Manor, New York (Cornell 
University) 

Pulito, Anne. East Rockaway, New York (Stonehill 
College) 



Reed, Angela, New York, New York (Marymount 
College) 

Reid, Claudia, Springfield, Massachusetts (University 
of Massachusetts) 

Rob, Caroline, Rochester, New York (Scripps College) 

Schuett, Mary, Woodhaven, New York (St. Francis 
College) 

Schultz, Caroline, Ozone Park, New York (Queens 
College) 

Searles, Carolyn, State College, Pennsylvania (Carle- 
ton College) 

Silver, Nancy, Scarsdale, New York (Colgate Univer- 
sity) 

Slota, Mona, Bronx, New York (Lehman College) 

Snedeker, Lynda, Valley Stream, New York (Univer- 
sity of Massachusetts) 

Stead, Laurel, Melville, New York (C. W. Post College) 

Stern, Susan, Boulder, Colorado (University of 
Colorado) 

Strasburg, Miriam, New York, New York (City College 
of New York) 

Stuart, Deborah, Ithaca, New York (Cornell Univer- 
sity) 

Swartz, Sue, Cambridge, Massachusetts (State Uni- 
versity of New York at Albany) 

Thompson, Leslie, Midlothian, Virginia (Mary Baldwin 
College) 

Timm, Janna, Lafayette, New Jersey (Barnard College) 

Way, Linda, Rye, New York (Ithaca College) 

Wheat, Kathryne, Elkhart, Indiana (Purdue Univer- 
sity) 

Wiener, Robin, Hallandale, Florida (Brandeis Univer- 
sity) 

Wilkinson, Kenneth, Ithaca, New York (Case Western 
Reserve University) 

Wiltsie, Frances, New York, New York (Brown Uni- 
versity) 

Wolf, Sandra, Chicago, Illinois (University of Illinois) 

Wolf. Susan, Brooklyn, New York (State University of 
New York at Bmghamton) 

Yen, Kathleen, New York, New York (Marymount 
College) 

Young, Judith, New York, New York (Florida State 
University) 

Zoller, Carolyn, Oyster Bay, New York (Skidmore 
College) 

Registered Nurse Students 

Armstrong, Kerry, Staten Island, New York (Mont- 

clair State College) 
Campbell, Eileen, Bronx, New York (Lehman College) 
Cha, Eun Sook, New York, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Conyers, Hope, New York, New York (Hunter College) 
Dugan, Patricia, New York, New York (Queens- 
borough Community College) 
Emanuel, Harriet, New York, New York (Queens- 
borough Community College) 
Green. Beverly. Rego Park. New York (Hunter College) 
Lang, Cheryl, Bronx, New York (Lehman College) 
LaRocca, Theresa, New York, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Levy, Sharon, New York, New York (Nassau Commu- 
nity College) 
Logan, Mary, New York, New York (Hunter College) 
Nadler, Francine, New York, New York (Queens- 
borough Community College) 






. 



Register 31 



Nirenberg, Anita. New York, New York (Bronx 
Community College) 

Pfmgsten, Linda, New York. New York (Hunter Col- 
lege) 

Schnute, Martha. New York, New York (Hunter Col- 
lege) 

Snyder, Gale, New York, New York (Immaculata 
College for Women) 

Sonncker, Mary. New York. New York (State Univer- 
sity College at Plattsburgh) 



Stephens. Myrna, Brooklyn. New York (Manhattan 
Community College) 

Taylor, Janet, New York. New York (Hunter College) 

Walsh. Maureen, Bellerose, New York (Queens Col- 
lege) 

Watson, Kathryn, New York. New York (Englewood 
Cliffs College) 

Wengrove, Claire (State University College at New 
Paltz) 



Cornell University 



Index 



Academic Calendar, 2-3 

Academic standing, 15 

Acceptance, dates of, 14; fee, 18 

Accreditation. 8 

Administration, University, 27; School, 27-28 

Admission, 13-14; general requirements, 13; 

College Graduate Program, 13-14; Registered 

Nurse Program, 13 
Applications, 14; dates for filing, 14; fee, 17; 

requests for. 35 
Assessment of Health Status of Adults, 24 
Assessment of Health Status of Children, 23 
Auditing of courses, 15; fee, 18 

Baccalaureate Degree Program for Registered 

Nurses. 11,13 
Bills, payment of. 18 
Biological science courses. 24 

Calendar. 2-3 

Care of the Adult Patient. 23 

Changes in program of study, 15 

Class of 1977. 29-30 

Clinical facilities, 21 

Clinical Nursing— Acute Care of Children or 

Adults, 24 
Clinical Nursing— Long-term Care or Chronic Illness 

of Children or Adults, 24 
Clinical Nursing— Primary Care of Children or 

Adults, 24 
College Graduate Program, 10-11, 13-14 
College Scholarship Service. 19 
Community Health, 23 
Continuing Education, Division of, 21 
Cornell Medical Center, 27; Joint Board, 27 
Cornell University administration, 27 
Counseling services, 20-21 
Courses, 23-26; plan for college graduates, 1 1 ; 

plan for registered nurses. 11-12 

Dean's List. 15 

Degree, requirements. 15, 17; with distinction. 17 

Department of Health, 21 

Dimensions of Nursing, 23 

Dismissal. 15 

Division of Continuing Education, 21 

Epidemiology, 24 

Exemption of Courses, examination, 15; fee, 18 

Expenses. 17-18 



Facilities, clinical. 21; housing, 20; for instruc- 
tion, 21; recreational, 20 

Faculty administration, 27-29; continuing educa- 
tion, 28-29; emeritus, 29; undergraduate. 28 

Fees, 17-18; special. 18; course, 18; 

Financial assistance, 18-20; application for. 19, 
dates for administering, 14, 19 

Food and Nutrition for Health, 25 

Foundations of nursing, 23 

Full-time study, 17 

Grades, 14-15 
Grants, 19-20 
Guided Study, 25 

Health services. 20 

History of School, 7-8 

Honor Society, 17 

Housing, costs, 17; information, 20; regulations, 20 

Independent Study. 25 

Information, request for. 35; visit for. 14 

Interpersonal Processes in Nursing, 23 

Introduction to Nursing, 23 

Introduction to Research, 25 

Instruction facilities, 21 

Instructors, 28 

Jacob S. Lasdon House, 20 
Joint Administration Board. 27 

Late Registration fee. 1 8 

Library, 21 

Life-span Growth and Development, 25 

Living out. 20 

Loans. 19-20 

Matriculated student. 1 5 

New York Hospital, 7; administration, 27; facilities 

for instruction, 21 
Nonmatriculated student, 15 
Nursing courses. 23-25 
Nursing in the Social Order. 25 
Nursing maior, 10-11. 13 

Objectives. 8 
Organization. Student. 20 



34 Index 



Parent-Child Nursing, 23 
Part-time study, 1 7 
Pharmacology, 24 
Philosophy, 8 
Professors, emeritus, 29 
Program for College Graduates, 1 1 
Program for Registered Nurses, 1 1, 



13 



Recreational facilities, 20 

Refunds, 18 

Register, 27-31 

Registered Nurse Program, 11,13 

Registration, late fee, 18; state, 17 

Reinstatement fee, 1 7 

Requirements, general, 13-14; degree, 

Research, Introduction to, 25 



5, 17 



Sigma Theta Tau, 1 7 
Social Order, Nursing in the, 25 
Social science courses, 25 
Spanish for Health Professionals, 25 
State registration for graduates, 1 7 
Students, 29-31 

Transfer fee, 1 7 

Tuition, 17 

Tuition Assistance Program, 19-20 

Undergraduate program, 8-11 

Visiting nurse, 21 
Visits to the School, 14 



Scholarships, 19-20 
School Organization, 20 



Withdrawal, 15; refund for, 18 
Women's Health, 25 






Further Information and Application 
Undergraduate Program 

It is important that persons interested in 
pursuing one of the programs at the School of 
Nursing make plans well in advance so that 
their college programs may be arranged to 
provide the necessary background. 

To receive assistance in such planning, or an 
application, an interested student should fill out 
the form on this page and send it to 

Admissions 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 

Nursing 
515 East 71 Street 
New York, New York 10021. 

(The writer should include a zip code.) 



Request Form 

□ I wish to apply for admission in September, 



(year) 

Please send me an application blank for 

□ College Graduate Program 

□ Registered Nurse Program 



street address 



city 



state zip 



date of birth 



name of high school 



address 



date high school diploma received 



name of college 



address 



dates of college attendance 



List of Announcements 

Following is a list of Announcements published by 
Cornell University to provide information on pro- 
grams, faculty, facilities, curricula, and courses of the 
various academic units. 

Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell 
College of Architecture, Art, and Planning 
College of Arts and Sciences: Introduction 
Graduate School of Business and Public 

Administration 
Engineering at Cornell 

Graduate Study in Engineering and Applied Sciences 
General Information* 
Graduate School 
School of Hotel Administration 
Human Ecology: College Choice 
School of Industrial and Labor Relations: 

ILR at Cornell 

Graduate Study at ILR 
Law School 

Medical College (New York City) 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences (New York City) 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 

Nursing (New York City) 
Officer Education (ROTC) 
Summer Session 
New York State College of Veterinary Medicine 

* The Announcement of General Information is 
designed to give prospective students pertinent in- 
formation about all aspects and academic units of the 
University. 

In addition to the Announcements listed above, the 
University publishes a master catalog of University 
courses, Cornell University: Description of Courses. 

Requests for the publications listed above should be 
addressed to 

Cornell University Announcements 

Edmund Ezra Day Hall 

Ithaca, New York 1 4853. 

(The writer should include a zip code.) 



Office of University Publications 
776 5.5M Hu 



m 



■•»<»«* 




• 9 



I WOULD 
FOUND AN 
INSTITUTE 
WHERE 




Cornell 

University 

Announcements 




I WOULD ANY PERSON 

FOUND AN (AN FIND 

INSTITUTION INSTRUCTION 

WHERE IN ANY STUDY 



Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



Cornell University 



Cornell University- 
New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 
515 East 71 Street 
New York, New York 10021 



1977-78 



Important Notice 

The baccalaureate degree programs described in this catalog 
will be discontinued in June, 1979. No applicants will be admitted 
to the program for college graduates after September, 1977 and 
no applicants will be admitted to the program for registered 
nurses after September, 1978. 



Cornell University Announcements 

Volume 69 of the Cornell University Announcements 
consists of sixteen catalogs, of which this is number 9 
dated August 11. 1977 Publication dates sixteen 
times a year (five times in August; twice in June and 
October, once in January, March, April, May, July, 
September, and December) Publisher Cornell Univer 
sity. Sheldon Court, 420 College Avenue. Ithaca. 
New York 14853. Second-class postage paid at 
Ithaca. New York 



Academic Calendar 



1977-78 



Orientation, Class of 1979, begins 9:00 a.m. 

Registration, new students and students not 
preregistered 

Orientation, Class of 1979, ends 5:00 p.m. 

Labor Day holiday 

Fall term instruction begins, all classes, 8:00 a.m. 

School holiday 

Progress grades due, all classes, 12:00 noon 

Preregistration for intersession and spring semester, 
continuing students 

Thanksgiving recess: 
Instruction suspended, 1:00 p.m. 
Instruction resumed, 7:30 a.m. 

Fall term instruction ends, all classes, 5:00 p.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin, 
9:00 a.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation end, 
5:00 p.m. 

Christmas recess begins, 5:00 p.m. 

Intersession begins, 9:00 a.m. 

Intersession ends, 5:00 p.m. 

Orientation, new students. 1:00 p.m. 

Registration, new students and students not 
preregistered, 3:00 p.m. 

Spring term instruction begins, all classes, 
8:00 a.m. 



Wednesday, August 31 

Thursday, September 1 
Friday, September 2 
Monday, September 5 
Tuesday, September 6 
Monday, October 10 
Friday, November 4 

November 14-18 



Wednesday, November 23 
Monday, November 28 

Friday, December 16 



Monday, December 19 

Wednesday, December 21 
Wednesday, December 21 
Monday, January 9 
Friday, January 27 
Friday, January 27 

Friday, January 27 

Monday, January 30 



School holiday 

Spring recess: 
Instruction suspended. 500 p.m. 
Instruction resumed. 7:30 a.m. 

Midsemester grades due. 5:00 p.m. 

Preregistration for summer session and fall 
semester, continuing students 

Spring term instruction ends, all classes. 
5.00 p.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation begin, 
1:00 p.m. 

Final examinations and clinical evaluation end, 
5:00 p.m. 

Grades due. Class of 1978, 5:00 p.m. 

Convocation and Commencement 

Grades due, Class of 1979. 5:00 p.m. 



Monday, February 20 

Friday, March 1 7 
Monday, March 27 

Thursday, April 6 

April 17-21 

Friday, May 12 

Monday, May 15 

Thursday, May 18 
Thursday, May 18 
Wednesday. May 24 
Friday, May 26 



The dates shown in the Academic Calendar are sub- 
ject to change at any time by official action of Cornell 
University. 

In enacting this calendar, the University has scheduled 
classes on religious holidays. It is the intent of the 
University that students missing classes due to the 
observance of religious holidays be given ample 
opportunity to make up work. 



(9 





Announcements 



Contents 



2 Academic Calendar 

7 History of the School 

8 Accreditation 

8 The Undergraduate Program 

13 Admission 

14 Grades and Academic Standing 
16 Degree Requirements 

16 State Registration for Graduates 

16 Expenses 

19 Financial Assistance 

21 General Information 

22 Division of Continuing Education 
22 Facilities for Instruction 

25 Description of Courses 

29 Register 

34 Index 

36 List of Announcements 



The courses and curricula described in this 
Announcement, and the teaching personnel listed 
herein, are subject to change at any time by official 
action of Cornell University. 



Cornell University 



Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 



History of the School 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing was established as a school in Cornell Uni- 
versity in 1942, on the sixty-fifth anniversary of the 
founding of The New York Hospital School of Nursing. 
One of the earliest nursing schools in the country, 
the School is part of The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center, which includes also the Cornell Uni- 
versity Medical College and the various buildings of 
The New York Hospital extending from Sixty-eighth 
to Seventy-second streets on the East River. 

The Center is a joint undertaking of the Society of 
the New York Hospital and Cornell University, and 
is committed to a fourfold purpose including: (1 ) care 
of the sick, providing the same wisdom and skill to 
rich and poor; (2) education of doctors and nurses, 
research workers, technicians, and others who will 
work in the field of medical science; (3) research to 
extend the boundaries of knowledge in the health 
fields; and (4) the promotion of public health through 
the development of preventive medicine. 

The New York Hospital is the second-oldest voluntary 
hospital in this country— its royal charter having been 
granted in 1771 in the reign of King George III. The 
first patients were soldiers wounded in the Revolu- 
tionary War. At that time, the Hospital was located on 
the lower end of Manhattan, the only part of the city 
then settled. On early maps the location was 
designated simply as "the Hospital." 

Cornell University, with its campus in Ithaca, New 
York, received its charter in 1865. Three circum- 
stances contributed to the founding of the University 
in the eventful years that marked the close of the 
Civil War. In the first place, Ezra Cornell, a citizen of 
Ithaca, had come into a large fortune from his hold- 
ings in the newly formed Western Union Telegraph 
Company and had devoted much thought to the good 
that might be done by giving his wealth to education. 
A second circumstance was the fact that the state of 
New York had received a substantial land grant, 
under the Morrill Act of 1862, for the support of 
colleges teaching agriculture and the mechanical arts. 
The third circumstance was that Mr Cornell had as a 
colleague in the state legislature of 1864-65, a young 
senator named Andrew D. White, later to become the 



first president of the University, who had the vision 
of preserving the state's land grant intact for a single 
great institution which should teach not only agri- 
culture and the mechanical arts but the humanities 
and the sciences as well. The Medical College, the 
School of Nursing, and the Graduate School of Medi- 
cal Sciences are the divisions of the University which 
are located in New York City. 

The Hospital had been operating for over one hun- 
dred years before a school for the training of nurses 
was opened. Early steps had been taken, however, to 
improve the care given to patients. In 1799 Dr. Valen- 
tine Seamen, a scholar and prominent physician, had 
organized a series of lectures, combined with a course 
of practical instruction in the wards, for the women 
whom the Hospital had engaged as "watchers" and 
"nurses." Although the theoretical content was meager 
and the practical instruction not systematically 
planned, these classes focused attention on the fact 
that women who had some preparation for their work 
gave better care than those without instruction. 
When, in 1873, the first training school in this country 
on the Nightingale pattern was opened in Bellevue 
Hospital, the Governors of the Society of the New 
York Hospital contributed to its support. Four years 
later, in 1877, when the Hospital moved to new build- 
ings, The New York Hospital Training School for 
Nurses was opened in quarters which were considered 
to have all the modern improvements of the times. 
The School moved to the present location when the 
Medical Center was opened in 1932. 

Since 1946 all students admitted to the Under- 
graduate Division have been candidates for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Nursing. In 1968, noting a 
shift in the educational background of individuals 
seeking admission to the School, a separate program 
for college graduates was started. As of the fall of 
1975, all students admitted to the generic bacca- 
laureate program must have the minimum of a bache- 
lor's degree in another discipline prior to admission 

In the fall of 1974, the School began to admit small 
groups of registered nurses to an upper-division 
major in nursing leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Nursing. 

The Division of Continuing Education was organized 
as an educational unit of the School of Nursing in 



8 Undergraduate Program 



1971. Although it is a nondegree-granting division of 
the School, it has the same status within the structure 
as the organizational unit for undergraduate programs 
leading to a degree. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing Alumni Association, originally the Alumnae 
Association of The New York Hospital School of 
Nursing, was organized in 1893. It was one of the ten 
alumnae associations that helped to bring about the 
national professional organization of nurses, now 
known as the American Nurses' Association. In 1945 
the Alumni Association became a part of the Cornell 
University Alumni Association. 

Accreditation 

The School is accredited by the Department of 
Baccalaureate and Higher Degree Programs of the 
National League for Nursing as a generic college pro- 
gram leading to a baccalaureate degree. 

The School is registered by the State Education 
Department, Division of Professional Education of 
the University of the State of New York. Cornell 
University is accredited by the Middle States Re- 
gional Accreditation Association. 

Undergraduate Program 

The Curricula 

The School of Nursing offers an undergraduate pro- 
gram for college graduates and one for registered 
nurses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing. In order to be eligible for the degree from 
Cornell, the last thirty credits must be taken in one 
of these programs. Each student entering the School 
is expected to complete the entire program for which 
he or she is enrolled. To meet the objectives of each 
program, students will have clinical experience in a 
variety of hospital and community settings. 

The faculty reserves the right to make changes in the 
curriculum that it believes are in keeping with the 
changing needs of society or in the best interests of 
the student and the School. 

Goals of the University 

The University's basic objective is to produce men 
and women of intellect and to equip them to use their 
abilities wisely. Cornell is not solely a place for 
memorizing data or mastering a vocation. It is, instead, 
a route to intellectual maturity, a means for develop- 
ing the ideas, insights, and values which form a 
permanent capacity for intellectual thought and action. 
Cornell students are prepared to use knowledge well 
for themselves and society. The diversity of Cornell 
contributes breadth and perspective to strong and 
specialized programs of study. 

Philosophy of the School of Nursing 

Education 

Education is a process that helps individuals to 



develop their potential so that they may function 
productively within existing and changing social 
systems. This is a dynamic process involving the active 
participation of students and teachers. The school 
provides the environment in which students can test 
their abilities and evaluate their progress. 

The major purposes of the general education courses 
preceding the nursing major are: to instill knowledge; 
to cultivate intellectual skills; and to nurture the 
traits of personality and character basic to a reasoned 
and responsible life. Because of the foundation pro- 
vided by these courses, it is anticipated that students 
will be prepared to better understand themselves, 
their social and physical environment, and the role 
of the professional nurse in society. 

Nursing 

The School of Nursing provides the professional 
education for leadership positions in nursing practice 
in a comprehensive health care system. Professional 
nurses practice interdependently with other health 
care professionals in a variety of health care settings. 
These nurses assume responsibility for promotion of 
individual and professional standards of nursing 
practice. They recognize the need to assume an ad- 
vocacy role on behalf of their clients and to speak on 
community and professional issues that are within 
their field of competence. As professional people they 
recognize the need to continue to develop personal and 
professional competence through the formal and in- 
formal educational structures that are best suited 
to their needs and abilities. 



Objectives of the Professional 
Program 

The nursing program aims to produce graduates who 
will: 

1 . Use cognitive skills of assessment, decision 
making, and evaluation in diagnostic, health 
maintenance, preventive, restorative, and 
therapeutic measures. 

2. Understand the interaction of the internal system 
of man with his external system in a health- 
illness continuum. 

3. Apply principles of group process in the delivery 
of health care. 

4. Function interdependently with other health 
professionals in the management of health care. 

5. Demonstrate characteristics for continuing 
professional development in nursing. 

6. Promote standards of nursing practice through 
assessment of existing practice. 

7. Understand the effect of formal and informal 
structures and the functions of health care de- 
livery systems in relation to nursing practice. 

8. Contribute to constructive change in nursing 
practice. 

9. Accept individual responsibility and account- 
ability for nursing practice. 

10. Utilize practice as a means of gathering data for 
refining and extending nursing theory and prac- 
tice. 







w 



10 Program of Study 



Program of Study 

Organization of Curriculum for the 
College Graduate 

The development of the curriculum reflects two 
components: a structural framework, which provides 
the skeleton for the curriculum, and a conceptual 
framework, which provides a unifying theme for 
organizing theoretical content for nursing and cognate 
courses, as well as for understanding the process of 
nursing. 



Structural Framework 

The structural framework of the curriculum rests on 
three major assumptions: 

1. The upper division of a baccalaureate program 
in nursing provides the specialized theoretical 
knowledge upon which professional nursing prac- 
tice rests. 

2. A clinical experience core provides the opportunity 
to develop proficiency in exercise of clinical judg- 
ment and skills essential to professional nursing 
practice. 

3. Baccalaureate programs prepare nurses who can 
assume roles (practice) as interdependent practi- 
tioners in a variety of health care settings. 

The curriculum, a sixty-credit upper-division nursing 
major, consists of nursing and cognate courses and a 
clinical experience core. The upper-division courses 
in biological and psychosocial sciences focus on the 
level and type of information that is essential to pro- 
vide theoretical understanding of the biological and 
psychosocial functions that reflect the adapting hu- 
man organism. Upper-division courses in nursing 
provide an additional knowledge base essential for 
nursing theory and practice 

Throughout the curriculum, there is an emphasis 
on the scientific mode of inquiry. Professional 
practitioners of nursing require more than the mastery 
of a particular body of professional information or a 
cluster of technical skills. They need intellectual 
leverage for continued learning, for modifying prac- 
tice, and for understanding the social forces that 
facilitate or impede their ability to function effectively 
in their personal and professional life. 

Since nursing is an applied science, the ability in a 
given situation to exercise clinical judgment and skill 
is critical. The clinical experience core provides the 
^opportunity to develop proficiency in the coordination 
of knowledge and skills essential for nursing practice. 
The focus is on nursing functions: on assessment and 
problem-related intervention through health counsel- 
ing, health education, preventive, restorative, and 
therapeutic measures. 

Each clinical nursing course is planned so that, within 
the course and within the sequence of courses, under- 
standing of and skill in the nursing process develop 
as a continuum. The programs are planned so that the 
student moves from the less complex situation to those 
that test his or her ability to provide leadership in the 
delivery of nursing care services: to function in a 
collegial relationship with other members of the 



health team: and to appreciate the emerging roles of 
professional nurses. 

In the first semester, the focus of the nursing major 
is on introducing the profession of nursing, the nursing 
process, the acquisition of skills in communication, 
and selected basic nursing skills. The student then 
progresses to the study of concepts of psychosocial 
needs and problems, and the physiological alterations 
of body processes of adult patients with representative 
acute medical-surgical health problems. At the end 
of the first semester the student has the option to 
register for either community health nursing or 
parent-child nursing. This option exists as long as 
space remains in the chosen course at the time of 
registration. 

The content of the parent-child course considers the 
needs of the mother, father, and child within the 
family group. It deals with theory and practice req- 
uisite to the health needs of women and children, 
relating this theory and practice to social trends and 
family influences. Normal growth and development are 
integrated throughout the course and experiences 
are provided for the promotion and maintenance of 
optimal health to families in a variety of settings. 

In community health, the focus is on aspects of pre- 
vention and intervention in selected health problems, 
including mental health. The common denominator 
used in teaching is the epidemiological approach. 
Experience is provided for the students to observe 
and participate in the dynamics of group process. 

Before registering for the final nursing course, all 
students must complete a course in assessment of 
health status. The nursing course of the final semester 
focuses on caring for patients with multiple and com- 
plex nursing needs; having responsibility for nursing 
care of groups of patients; and participating in the 
leadership activities related to nursing care. The 
clinical experience of this semester may be in either 
a hospital or community agency. With guidance the 
student participates in selecting the agency for his or 
her final experience. 

Pharmacology, nutrition, and diet therapy are in- 
cluded within the structure of all of the nursing courses 
of the curriculum. 

The biological science and professionally related 
courses are offered concurrently with the nursing 
courses. Courses in the biological sciences correlate 
the sequential development of basic concepts and 
theories with the requirements of the various clinical 
courses. The student selects the sequence of the 
remaining professionally related courses. 

Conceptual Framework 

Content and process are two dimensions central to 
the development of the conceptual framework. They 
are complementary components which are viewed in 
the context of a dynamic relationship. The approach 
to the selection of content for the curriculum is through 
the delineation of essential concepts. Essential con- 
cepts are derived from general systems theory and the 
basic sciences. This approach provides a structure 
within which nursing knowledge can be synthesized. 
Likewise, this approach allows students and faculty 



Program of Study 11 



the opportunity to test general propositions (infer- 
ences) tor validity and reliability within the context 
of selected phenomena in the practice setting The 
premise is that although a concept may remain a con- 
stant element within the curriculum, the theoretical 
basis for the concept is constantly being altered 
through additional empirical evidence in nursing prac- 
tice or through advances in science and technology 
Delineation of these essential concepts also provides 
a structure within which nursing practice can be 
analyzed 

Organization of the Curriculum for the 
Registered Nurse 

The organization of the curriculum of the baccalaure- 
ate degree program for registered nurses (graduates 
of hospital diploma and associate degree programs) is 
similar to the program for college graduates and like- 
wise reflects two components a structural framework, 
which provides the skeleton for the curriculum, and a 
conceptual framework, which provides a unifying 
theme for organizing theoretical content for nursing 
and cognate courses, as well as for understanding the 
process of nursing. 

Structural Framework 

Candidates who have successfully completed the 
prerequisite admission requirements of sixty credits 
of general education courses, successful achievement 
in the New York State College Proficiency Examina- 
tion, and successful achievement on the Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 
Clinical Proficiency Examination are considered for 
admission to the program The assumptions for the 
structural framework of the curriculum are similar 
to those of the curriculum for college graduates 

The curriculum is a thirty-credit, upper-division nurs- 
ing major consisting of nursing and cognate courses 
and a clinical experience core In the instance of 
graduate nurse students, the assumptions reflect 
validation of previous education and experience in 
nursing. The upper-division courses in biological and 
psychosocial sciences focus on the level and type of 
information that is essential to provide theoretical 
understanding of the biological and psychosocial func- 
tions that reflect the adapting human organism. 

Conceptual Framework 

In this curriculum, the clinical nursing core, or the 
study of the practice of nursing, will focus on the 
process of nursing as a system-oriented process in 
the three domains of primary, acute, and long-term 
care The clinical experience core provides the struc- 
ture for preparation of interdependent practitioners 
Associated seminars serve as a mode for extending 
the scope of knowledge and experience and for de- 
veloping professional peer communication and 
decision-making skills 

Program of Study for 
College Graduates 

College graduates must earn a minimum of sixty-two 
credits in the School of Nursing to be eligible for the 



degree in nursing In general, students registered 
for full-time study are advised to carry 1 5 to 1 6 credits 
per semester 

The following 62 credits are required for the degree 
Nursing Courses 



Clinical Nursing Courses 
Nursing 156 
Nursing 157 
Nursing 256 
Nursing 257 

Related Nursing Courses 
Nursing 160 
Nursing 360a 

Professionally Related Courses 

Biological Science Courses 
Biological Science 133* 
Biological Science 134 
Biological Science 136 

Social Science Courses 
Social Science 109, Life-span 

Growth and Development. Pari I* 
Social Science 110, Life-span 

Growth and Development, Part II 
Social Science 108, Research 
Social Science 207, Nursing in the 

Social Order 



Credits 
10 
10 
10 
12 

Credits 
1 
2 



Credits 
3 
3 
3 

Credits 



' Required unless exempted by appropriate examina- 
tion approved by the School of Nursing 



Electives 

Course 

Pharmacology 140 

Epidemiology 247 

Spanish for Professionals 

Women's Health 

Food and Nutrition for Health 

Nursing 360b 



Credits 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1-2 



A minimum enrollment of ten students is required 
for each course in the School to be offered 

A student may also elect Guided Study, Independent 
Study and/or a Clinical Nursing Practicum with the 
approval of the appropriate committee 

Program of Study 
for Registered Nurses 

Registered nurses must earn thirty credits in the 
School of Nursing after completing the prerequisites 
for admission to the degree program In general, 
registered nurses are part-time students and so are 
advised to select their courses carefully before regis- 
tering each semester 

The following 30 credits are required for the degree 



Nursing Courses 

Clinical Nursing Courses 
Nursing 365 or 366 
Nursing 367 



Credits 
5 
5 





! Hi » »•!'.. 


LV 


Hi 





—•""^ IL 



Admission 13 



Related Nursing Courses 
Nursing 360a 



Credits 
2 



Specific Requirements for the Baccalaureate 
Degree Program for Registered Nurses 



Professionally Related Courses 

Biological Science Courses 
Biological Science 133 
Biological Science 136 

Social Science Courses 
Social Science 109. Life-span 

Growth and Development. Part I 
Social Science 110. Life-span 

Growth and Development, Part II 
Social Science 108. Research 
Social Science 207. Nursing in the 

Social Order 

Other Required Courses 

Course 

Pharmacology 140 
Epidemiology 247 



Credits 
3 
3 

Credits 



Credits 
2 
2 



A minimum enrollment of ten students is required for 
each course in the School to be offered 



Admission 

General Requirements 

The number of qualified applicants exceeds the 
number of students that can be admitted to the pro- 
grams of the nursing major each year Applicants 
selected will be those who. in competition with others 
seeking admission at the same time, have demon- 
strated by their qualifications that they are well fitted 
for the nursing profession. 

Evaluation of the candidate's ability to profit from the 
instruction at the School of Nursing is based on sec- 
ondary school and college records, the recommenda- 
tions of school authorities, and the results of 
standardized achievement tests Evidence of the 
candidate's ability to make effective use of free time 
and capacity for leadership and concern for others is 
given due consideration Evaluations are also made 
on the basis of extracurricular activities, references, 
and an interview Interviews are granted only to those 
applicants meeting certain minimum admission 
standards A favorable disposition on a student's 
application cannot be made unless the student attends 
a personal interview at the School of Nursing An 
extensive medical report is required because of the 
nature of the professional program. 

College graduates already enrolled in the nursing 
major of another college or university may request 
the evaluation of their college records for possible 
transfer to the School at Cornell. 

It is the policy of Cornell University actively to support 
equality of educational opportunity No student shall 
be denied admission to the University or be discrim- 
inated against otherwise because of race, color, creed, 
religion, national or ethnic origin, or sex 



Registered nurses who are employed by The New York 
Hospital-Cornell Medical Center or an affiliating 
agency or have earned a certificate from the Division 
of Continuing Education of the School of Nursing may 
be considered for admission to this program of the 
nursing major Each applicant must complete a mini- 
mum of sixty semester hours of general education 
courses at any university, college, or junior college 
accredited by one of the regional associations of col- 
leges and secondary schools Applicants are allowed 
to transfer up to fifteen credits of general education 
courses from the New York State College Proficiency 
Subject Examinations (CPE) and/or the College Level 
Examination Program Subject Examinations (CLEP) 

Upon completion of forty-five semester hours of 
credits, including the required courses in the natural 
and social sciences, applicants may register for se- 
lected courses in the professional major as non- 
matriculated students while concurrently completing 
the sixty-credit requirement 

Applicants to this program are required to take the 
NLN Pre-Nursing and Guidance Examination, The 
University of the State of New York College Pro- 
ficiency Examinations. Baccalaureate Level, in Adult 
Nursing, Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing, and 
Maternal-Child Nursing, and the Cornell University- 
New York Hospital School of Nursing Clinical Pro- 
ficiency Examination. The NLN Pre-Nursmg and 
Guidance Examination and the New York State 
College Proficiency Examinations in Nursing must 
have been taken no more than five years prior to the 
individual's anticipated year of enrollment. These 
results must be received at the School by the deadline 
for filing the formal application for admission in order 
to be available for review by the Admissions Office 

Thirty credits by examination will be granted for 
satisfactory performance in the New York State Col- 
lege Proficiency Examinations and the Cornell Uni- 
versity-New York Hospital School of Nursing Clinical 
Proficiency Examination 

The following distribution of general education courses 
is required for admission: 

Communications, 6 credits: composition, public 
speaking, or speech. 

Humanities, 20-30 credits art. language, literature, 
music, philosophy, religion. No credit will be granted 
for studio humanities courses, such as painting, 
ceramics, voice, etc 

Natural science and mathematics. 1 2 credits general 
biology or an acceptable substitute (4 credits) and 
general chemistry (4 credits) are required Transfer 
credit will not be granted for science courses with an 
ecological or sociological approach or for a "D" grade 
in the natural sciences Any applicant who completed 
a general biology course before 1964 may be required 
to take a challenge examination in biology or take a 
biology course before admission to fulfill the general 
biology requirement 

Social science and history. 12-22 credits, sociology 
(3 credits required), psychology (3 credits required). 



14 Grades and Academic Standing 



political science, anthropology, economics, history, 
geography. Transfer credit will not be granted for a 
"D" grade in the required sociology and psychology 
courses. 

Individuals who plan to submit proficiency examina- 
tion results in any of the four required subject areas 
of biology, chemistry, psychology, and sociology must 
have taken the examinations no more than five years 
prior to the anticipated year of enrollment. 

Specific Requirements for the College Graduate 

Persons who hold or are to be awarded a baccalaureate 
degree by an accredited senior college or university 
may be considered for admission to this program of the 
nursing major. Applicants will be required to take 
the Graduate Record Examination. 

The following distribution of courses is required for 
admission to the Program for College Graduates. 

Humanities, 10 credits. 

Social science, 10 credits: sociology (3 credits re- 
quired), psychology (3 credits required). Transfer 
credit will not be granted for a "D" grade in the 
required sociology and psychology courses. 

Natural science and mathematics, 8 credits: general 
biology or an acceptable substitute (4 credits) and 
general chemistry (4 credits) are required. Transfer 
credit will not be granted for science courses with an 
ecological or sociological approach or for a "D" grade 
in the natural sciences. Any applicant who completed 
a general biology course before 1964 may be required 
to take a challenge examination in biology or take a 
biology course before admission to fulfill the general 
biology requirement. 

Those college graduates who have not yet completed 
the required science or social science courses may 
fulfill any or all of these requirements by taking a 
New York State College Proficiency Subject Examina- 
tion (CPE) or a College Level Examination Program 
Subject Examination (CLEP) in biology, chemistry, 
psychology, or sociology. 

Individuals who plan to submit proficiency examina- 
tion results in any of these subjects must have taken 
the examinations no more than five years prior to the 
anticipated year of enrollment. 



Applications 

Prospective students should write the Office of Ad- 
missions, Cornell University-New York Hospital 
School of Nursing, 515 East 71 Street, New York, 
New York 1 0021 , for forms to be used in making 
application for admission. 

Important Dates 

For College Graduates 

The following information and dates apply for 
applicants to the Program for College Graduates. 
Requests for applications may be made any time after 
May 1, 1977, for admission in September 1978. 
Admissions applications are due by October 1 , 1 977. 
for early review and by January 1, 1978, for regular 



review. Applications will be released and accepted 
after January 1, if places remain to be filled. 

Early review decisions are announced by January 1 . 
Though all qualified applicants who have completed 
their applications by October 1 will be interviewed 
in the fall, only those meeting the criteria for early 
review will receive their admissions decision by 
January 1. 

Decisions made by regular review are announced in 
March and April. Applications submitted after January 
1 will be acted upon as they are completed. Those 
applicants who do not qualify for the program will be 
notified once their application has been reviewed. 

Each applicant accepted by regular review must 
advise the School of his or her decision regarding 
admission within two weeks of acceptance. Upon 
acceptance, early review applicants will be advised of 
the date their decision is due. 

For Registered Nurses 

The following information and dates apply for regis- 
tered nurse applicants. A preliminary application may 
be filed at any time. (No fee is required.) This entitles 
the applicant to advisement relative to planning a 
program of study to meet the general education 
requirements. The formal application for admission 
should be filed by applicants who have earned at 
least forty-five of the required sixty general education 
credits. 

The application and all accompanying forms must be 
received by April 1 for the fall semester and October 1 
for the spring semester. Applicants will be notified 
about their admission status by July 1 for the fall 
semester and January 1 for the spring semester. 

For All Applicants 

The Financial Assistance Application must be filed 
by March 1 . Decisions are announced May 1 . Offers 
must be accepted within three weeks of receipt. 

Visits to the School 

Members of the staff are available to meet with pro- 
spective applicants to discuss the School's admission 
requirements, application procedures, and the appro- 
priateness of the applicant's general education in 
satisfying the requirements for admission. Appoint- 
ments for these visits are required. Prospective 
applicants are asked to call the Admissions Office 
to schedule an appointment. 

An informational visit does not take the place of the 
required interview, which is scheduled after applica- 
tion materials have been submitted and reviewed. 

Grades and Academic 
Standing 

The Academic Standards Committee, composed of 
faculty representing the programs of the curriculum 
and the dean or her representative, meets at least four 
times each year to review the academic records of 
students in the School. The committee is responsible 
for reviewing the records of students whose cumulative 
average does not meet minimal standards, whose 



Grades and Academic Standing 15 



cumulative average has dropped seriously since the 
previous semester, or students whose performance in 
the major nursing course is below the acceptable level 
of achievement 

The committee recommends to the faculty the candi- 
dates for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing 
The committee acts on the records of those students 
who qualify for the Dean's List and those who are to 
be considered for graduation with distinction 

The grading system is based on a 4 scale as follows 

4 0-3.5 (100-90% - A), excellent to very good; 
3.4-2.5 (89-80% = B), good. 2.4-1 5 (79-70% - C). 
satisfactory. 1 4-0.5 (69-60% = D). below acceptable 
level. 4-0.0 (below 60% = F), failing 

5 and U Grades: Final grades of S (satisfactory) and U 
(unsatisfactory) are reported for most clinical labora- 
tory courses and for a limited number of other courses 
A grade of S in clinical laboratory courses is equivalent 
to 2 or higher; a grade of U means failing For other 
courses, a grade of S is equivalent to 1 5 or higher and 
a grade of U to 1 4 or lower The specified course 
credit will be given for grades of S; no credit will be 
given for grades of U S and U grades have no numeri- 
cal value and are not used in computing grade point 
averages 

Incomplete Grades An incomplete (INC) is a tempo- 
rary grade. It is given only when students are unable 
to complete all the requirements for a course because 
of illness and/or prolonged absence due to circum- 
stances beyond their control. 

Students who receive an incomplete in a course are 
required to complete the course work within one year 
after the grade is recorded or the grade will be changed 
to a U. If the incomplete is in a course that is prerequi- 
site to another course, the student must complete the 
required work before registering for the subsequent 
course 

The faculty may grant approval for a student to repeat 
a course and/or a full semester if, for acceptable 
reasons, the student's achievement was below the 
School's expected level In such instances, the first 
grade(s) will not appear on the official records. Nota- 
tions to this effect will be entered on the back of the 
transcript but will under no circumstances be disclosed 

Notice of Grades: Grades are issued directly to the 
students at the end of each semester Parents and 
guardians may be notified when a student is asked to 
withdraw from the School 

Exemption of Courses: Because most college grad- 
uates who enroll in the School of Nursing have earned 
a number of college credits in psychology, all students 
who accept a place in the entering class are required 
to take an exemption examination for the course 
Social Science 109. Life-span Growth and Develop- 
ment, Part I before they enter the school. The CLEP 
test "Human Growth and Development Subject 
Examination" is used as the exemption examination 

College graduates who wish to obtain credit by ex- 
amination for the Biological Science 133 course may 
also take an exemption examination The American 
College Testing Program's proficiency examination 
in anatomy and physiology and the New York State 
College Proficiency Examination subject examination 



in anatomy and physiology are used as the exemption 
examinations 

Detailed information concerning these examinations 
and registration materials are forwarded to all 
students once they have accepted a place in the class 
Upon successful completion of either exemption 
examination, the student's transcript will show the 
course and credits earned by examination Students 
who are successful on an exemption examination but 
who feel they want the course content must register for 
the course and fulfill all requirements It is not 
possible to audit these courses There will be no tuition 
refund for those who exempt. 

Auditing Courses: Students who wish to audit a course 
by regular attendance with the privilege of partici- 
pating in class discussions and obtaining all course 
materials may do so by making formal application to 
the Office of Records Courses with limited enrollment, 
laboratory courses (clinical and science), and seminar 
courses will not be open to auditors An audited course 
will not appear on a student's record. 

Changes in Programs of Study: Students may change 
their registration for elective courses during the one 
week change-of-program period at the beginning of 
each semester A Change of Program Request form 
signed by the student's adviser must be filed in the 
Office of Records by the second Tuesday of the fall 
semester and the second Monday of the spring semes- 
ter. Students will be notified of the action on their 
request by the Office of Records Requests to add 
courses will be honored within the enrollment limita- 
tions of the course 

Academic Standing 

In order to be in good standing for a semester, a 
student must: (1 ) attain a grade of 2.0 or better in 
nursing theory, 1 .5 or better in related courses, and S 
in clinical laboratory courses; and (2) have a minimal 
cumulative average (MCA.) for the semester as 
follows: first semester, 1 6; second semester, 1 76 
third semester. 1.82; and fourth semester. 1 83 

Students whose grades or averages fall below these 
levels at midsemester and/or end of semester will be 
placed on academic warning by the Office of the Dean 
A student may remain on academic warning for only 
one semester If the conditions of the warning have not 
been removed by the end of the next semester, the 
student will be required to withdraw from the School 
of Nursing. 

Students who have met all of the admission require- 
ments are classified as matriculants Students who 
have not yet met all the admission requirements are 
considered nonmatnculants. Nonmatriculant students 
will be notified when they have achieved matriculant 
status by the director of admissions 

Dean's List 

Students who attain a semester average of 3.50 with- 
out any grades below 1 5 or U grades and have com- 
pleted all of the required course work by the end of 
the semester are eligible for the Dean's List Only 
students who are enrolled as full-time students and 
have achieved matriculant status are eligible for the 



16 Expenses 



Dean's List. The Dean's List will be posted by the 
Office of Records. 

Dismissal 

The faculty of the School of Nursing reserves the 
privilege of retaining only those students who in their 
judgment demonstrate satisfactory progress towards 
the degree, meeting the requirements of scholarship, 
mental and physical health, and personal attributes 
considered suitable for professional nursing practice. 
Students whose suitability for nursing is questioned 
may be asked to withdraw from the School. 

Withdrawal 

A student may withdraw from the School at any time. 
The designation of withdrawal in good standing will 
be recorded if the student's academic and personal 
performance is in accord with the standards of the 
School and the financial record has been cleared. A 
student who plans to withdraw must notify the Office 
of Records and discuss the reason for leaving with 
the dean. 



Degree Requirements 

The degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing is con- 
ferred by Cornell University upon recommendation of 
the faculty of the School of Nursing. In order to qualify 
for the degree, the candidate must have attained the 
required cumulative average for the total program and 
have completed satisfactorily all theory and clinical 
laboratory courses outlined in this Announcement 
and/or required by decision of the faculty. 

Registered nurses must complete thirty required 
credits in the School of Nursing to be eligible for the 
degree. College graduates must complete a minimum 
of sixty-two required credits in the School of Nursing 
to be eligible for the degree. 

Bachelor of Science with Distinction 

Effective with the Class of 1 978, candidates for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Nursing with distinc- 
tion must fall within the top 15 percent of the gradu- 
ating class. To be eligible for this honor, a student may 
not have been on academic warning for any reason 
while at the School of Nursing and must have adhered 
to professional and ethical standards of behavior. 
In addition, the registered nurse students must have 
"achieved a grade of "B" on all required New York State 
College Proficiency Examinations in nursing to be 
eligible for consideration. 

Sigma Theta Tau 

In 1968 the School received a charter for the Alpha 
Upsilon chapter of Sigma Theta Tau, the National 
Honor Society of Nursing. The purposes of the society 
are to recognize the achievement of scholarship of 
superior quality, to promote the development of leader- 
ship qualities, and to encourage creative work while 
fostering high professional ideals. It is hoped that the 
commitment of the individual to the ideals and pur- 



poses of professional nursing will be strengthened by 
participation in the honor society. 

Students who have completed at least one-half of the 
nursing major, and have a minimum grade point 
average of 3.0, are considered for induction into 
Alpha Upsilon chapter. In addition to demonstrated 
superior scholastic achievement, a candidate also 
must give evidence of professional leadership 
potential. 

Eligibility for State Registration 

Graduates of the generic program are eligible for 
admission to the licensing examination in all states. 
Since states require a nurse to be licensed in order to 
practice nursing, each graduate is expected to take the 
first licensing examination that is administered 
following completion of the program. Students should 
carefully consider the licensure rules of the state in 
which they plan to practice and the licensure require- 
ments of their employer when deciding where to take 
the examination. Satisfactory performance on the 
licensing examination results in state registration of 
the license and the designation of Registered Nurse. 



Expenses 



The costs of attending the School of Nursing fall into 
two general categories. The first category includes 
certain fixed charges for tuition, fees, and charges 
for services provided by the School. The second cate- 
gory includes living costs and items of personal 
expense. To help students prepare their individual 
budgets an estimated budget is published. Although 
expenses, excluding fixed fees, vary for the individual 
student, the estimated budget reflects the usual ex- 
penses for single, full-time students living in Univer- 
sity housing. 

Estimated expenses for the academic year include: 

Item Amount 

'Tuition $3000 

Books and supplies (first year) 300 

(second year) 200 

Uniform supplies (first year) 200 

Special course fees 70 

Transportation (clinical experience) 150 

Housing 1050 

Food and maintenance 1300 

"Health insurance 220 

Incidental expenses 1000 

* Tuition: A semester of full-time study consists of 
12-18 credit hours of course work. This may be any 
combination of required, elective, or audited courses. 
The full tuition will be charged and there will be no 
prorated refund for courses dropped or exempted: nor 
will there be an additional charge for electives added 
within this number of credit hours. 

** Health insurance: Each student is required to be 
enrolled in a health insurance plan. An associated 
hospital plan is available to all students in the Medical 
Center. Students will be exempt from enrollment in 
the Center plan if they give evidence of carrying com- 
parable health insurance and sign a waiver to that 



Expenses 17 



effect at the time of admission and every semester 
thereafter while registered in the School. Students 
enrolled in the plan available at the Medical Center 
will be billed each semester These charges will appear 
as a separate item on the bill and will reflect the cur- 
rent insurance rates. Questions concerning waivers 
or billing should be discussed with the assistant to the 
dean on S 10 

A semester of part-time study consists of eleven or 
fewer credit hours of course work This may be any 
combination of required and elective courses The 
maximum number of credits to be taken by an in- 
dividual registered for part-time study will be by 
advisement. Tuition of $100 per credit hour will be 
charged 

Fees 

Application Fee. (For applicants registered in a 
general education program.) A fee of $20 must ac- 
company the application for first admission. 

Transfer Fee. (For applicants registered in a bac- 
calaureate nursing program.) A fee of $25 is charged 
to evaluate the record of a student already registered 
in a baccalaureate nursing program who wishes to 
apply for transfer to the School. 

Reinstatement Fee. (For students previously regis- 
tered in the School.) A fee of $10 will be charged to 
evaluate the record of a former student seeking to 
reregister in the School. 

Acceptance Fee. A nonrefundable deposit of $50 is 
required of every student upon acceptance for ad- 
mission to the University; when the student first 
registers, it is used to cover matriculation costs. The 
deposit does not apply to the first semester's tuition 
and fees. 

Late Registration Fee. A fee of $5 is charged to 
each late registrant. First-semester registration closes 
at 5 p.m. on September 2, 1977. Second-semester 
registration closes at 5 p.m. on Friday, January 27, 
1978. 



Special Fees 

Fee for Auditing a Course. There will be no charge 
for full-time students. Part-time students will be 



charged $45 for the privilege of receiving the course 
outline, the bibliography, and attending selected 
classes 

Course Fees 

Certain nonrefundable fees are charged during the 
semester in which a student is registered for the desig- 
nated course. (See course fee schedule on this page ) 
This fee covers the use of school equipment and sup- 
plies necessary for meeting the ob|ectives of the course 
In certain instances there will be an additional charge 
for items lost or damaged 

Payment of Bills 

Bills for fixed charges are distributed approximately 
two weeks prior to each semester. The bill is due and 
payable the first day of each semester, unless special 
arrangements have been made with the School. The 
amount, time, and manner of payment of tuition, fees, 
or other charges may be changed at any time without 
notice. Students who have questions regarding their 
bills or the payment of grants or loans should see the 
assistant to the dean on S 10. 

Provision is made for the payment of bills during the 
registration period at the beginning of each semester 
Financial assistance awarded by the School, except 
loans, will be applied directly to the fixed charges No 
reimbursement of assistance offered as a grant is an- 
ticipated unless the student voluntarily leaves the 
School during the course of a semester. In this case, a 
proportionate amount of the grant, not to exceed one- 
half, is to be reimbursed. 

In order for a student to remain in good standing, 
receive an honorable withdrawal from the School, or 
participate in the commencement exercises, all bills 
must be paid and satisfactory arrangements made for 
the future repayment of loans. Any student who regis- 
ters for a semester and then withdraws before the 
semester bill is paid must make a satisfactory settle- 
ment of tuition and fees due before the withdrawal 
form can be signed. 

A student completes arrangements for a loan autho- 
rized by the School by signing a note and receiving 
the check during the registration period. The proceeds 
of a loan must be applied to the balance due on School 
charges. They may not be claimed as a credit on 
the bill. 



Course Fee Schedule 



Course 
N 156 
N 157 
N 256 




Nonrefundable fee 
$25 
$ 5 
$ 5 


N 257 
N 360 




Charges depend on selection of 

final clinical experience 

$10 


N 365 or N 366 
N367 

Epidemiology 


$ 5 
$ 5 
$ 8 



Additional charges for loss or damage 

none 

Denver developmental kits 

Sphygmomanometer and cuff 

supplies in public health bag 

Charges depend on selection of final 

clinical experience 

Assessment bag and any part of 

contents 

none 

none 

none 



Ail Ml 



! 






ctcoUL 




Financial Assistance 19 



New York State tuition assistance awards may not be 
claimed as an exemption from the tuition bill since 
the state prepares individual checks, that are payable 
to the student, and sends them to the School for dis- 
tribution. Checks for these awards will not be available 
at the time tuition and fees are due When an extension 
of time for payment of part or all of the tuition and 
fees is granted, based on a New York State award, it 
is with the understanding that should the state for any 
reason fail to prepare a check for the amount of the 
award, the student is personally responsible for the 
amount due. 

Refunds 

Part of the tuition will be refunded to students who of- 
ficially withdraw during the first half of the semester. 
The refund will be based on a deduction of 10 percent 
a week on all charges as of the first day of the semes- 
ter. No refund will be made after the midsemester. 



Application for Financial Assistance 

Entering students who will need financial assistance 
should return the Financial Assistance Application 
with their application forms by March 1 These will 
be forwarded to the chairperson of the Financial 
Assistance Committee. The Financial Aid Form should 
be filed through the College Scholarship Service by 
March 1 of the year the applicant anticipates ad- 
mission to the School of Nursing. 

Students enrolled in the School who expect to register 
for the next academic year and who anticipate the 
need for financial assistance, should complete their 
applications by March 1. Students receiving financial 
assistance may arrange an interview with the 
chairperson of the committee during the fall semester 
to review their awards. All students, whether receiving 
financial assistance or not, whose financial situations 
change during an academic year, should feel free to 
discuss their problems with the chairperson of the 
committee. 



Financial Assistance 



In general, students plan to meet the cost of their 
education through self-help (loans and employment). 
To the extent that is possible, parents and spouse are 
expected to contribute to the cost of a student's 
education. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing participates in the College Scholarship Service 
(CSS) of the College Entrance Examination Board. 
Participants in CSS subscribe to the principle that the 
amount of financial assistance granted a student 
should be based upon financial need. The CSS assists 
colleges and universities and other agencies in deter- 
mining the student's need for financial assistance. 
Each entering student who seeks financial assistance 
is required to submit a copy of the Financial Aid Form 
to the College Scholarship Service by March 1 , desig- 
nating Cornell University-New York Hospital School 
of Nursing as one of the recipients. The Financial Aid 
Form should be obtained from the School of Nursing. 

Financial assistance is offered to matriculated stu- 
dents, usually as a combination of scholarship or 
grant and loan. The scholarships and grants adminis- 
tered by the School are described below. These are 
assigned on the basis of need rather than academic 
rating. 

Loans may be available from a fund established 
jointly by the School and the federal government. No 
more than $2,500 may be borrowed by a student 
during an academic year. The amount of the loan 
awarded to an eligible student is dependent upon the 
total amount of federal funding made available to the 
School. To be eligible for either a grant or a loan, a 
student must intend to be matriculated and enrolled 
at least half-time and demonstrate the need for fi- 
nancial assistance. In addition, the student must be 
a citizen or national of the United States, or have 
immigration status and personal plans to justify the 
conclusion that he or she intends to become a perma- 
nent resident of the United States. 



Financial Assistance Administered 
by the School 

Vivian B. Allen Scholarship Fund. Established as 
an endowed fund by gifts from the Vivian B. Allen 
Foundation, Inc., income from which is used to provide 
scholarship aid annually for one or more students in 
need of financial assistance. 

Allstate Foundation Grant. A grant is made avail- 
able to the School each year to assist a student 
throughout the program. 

Juliette E. Blohme Scholarship Fund. Established 
as an endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. George H. Van 
Emburgh as a memorial to Juliette E. Blohme of the 
class of 1922 through a gift of $6,000, the interest on 
which may be used in whole or in part each year. 

Fund of the Committee for Scholarships. A fund, 
established and maintained by a committee of women 
interested in the School of Nursing, to assist students 
who need financial help in order to prepare for nursing. 
Awards from the fund are made to entering students 
and to students enrolled in the School. 

Davison/Foreman Foundation Grant. Grants from 
this foundation are allocated in the spring semester 
for the education of women working for a college 
degree. The awards are made to students enrolled in 
the School. 

Samuel J. Moritz Scholarship Fund. Established 
in 1960 as a memorial to Samuel J. Moritz. and 
made possible by a gift from Edward Moritz and 
LeRoy Moses, executors of his estate. The income 
provides scholarship aid annually to one or more stu- 
dents in need of financial assistance 

Cleta and Henry Offerman Scholarship. An en- 
dowed fund established in 1976 by a bequest from 
the Estate of Henry Offerman. The income from the 
fund is to be awarded to worthy students with pro- 
fessional potential who maintain satisfactory scholastic 






J» 



V - 



i 




/ 




General Information 21 



grades and who require financial assistance to com- 
plete the course in nursing 

Helena Rubinstein Foundation, Inc. Grant. Grants 
from this foundation are made available to the School 
and administered to students who have demonstrated 
need for financial assistance 

The Louis and Rachel Rudln Foundation Scholar- 
ship. Established in 1973 pursuant to the provisions 
of the will of Edward Rudin to provide for tuition and 
support of worthy students who would otherwise not 
be able to pursue careers as nurses Scholarships are 
awarded to citizens of the United States without 
regard to age. sex. creed, or race 

Tudor Foundation Student Loan Fund. A loan fund 
established by the foundation and administered by the 
School to assist students in need of aid who hold 
scholarships or grants to defray the cost of tuition and 
who need further financial assistance to enable them 
to attend the School. Loans from the fund are not to 
exceed $1 .000 to any one student in any one school 
year. 

The Christian C. Yegen Scholarship Fund. Estab- 
lished in the spring of 1965 as a memorial to Mr. 
Christian C Yegen, father of an alumna of the Cornell 
University-New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

Financial Assistance Administered 
by Outside Sources 

New York State Regents Scholarships, 
Grants, and Loans 

The following assistance is available for residents of 
New York State. 

Tuition Assistance Program. Grants up to $1 .400 
yearly depending on need and tuition paid, with a 
minimum yearly grant of $100. For those students 
who demonstrate a capacity to pursue a degree and 
plan to attend college, and to those who are presently 
in college and maintain satisfactory academic per- 
formance 

For more information on these awards, write to the 
New York State Higher Education Services Corpora- 
tion, Tower Buildings, Empire State Plaza. Albany, 
New York 12255. 

New York Higher Education Assistance Corpora- 
tion sponsors a program through which students may 
obtain loans from local savings banks 

General Information 

School Organization 

All matriculated students are members of the Student 
Organization. The functions of the organization are 
to contribute to the development of the professional 
education of the individual student through coopera- 
tion with the medical community and to provide an 
all-inclusive organization through which student 
concerns may be voiced and resolved. 



The Student Senate represents the Student Organiza- 
tion in determining and administering policy Its aims 
are to coordinate and supervise the activities of the 
standing committees, to promote awareness of and 
involvement in the growth of the nursing profession, 
and to act as a channel of communication for the stu- 
dents within the academic nursing community and the 
broader medical community 

Housing 

Facilities 

Students attending the School of Nursing may live in 
University housing or select their own living facilities 
within the community Applications for University 
housing should be available about April 1 

There are two main residence facilities for nursing 
students Assignments to a particular facility are made 
based upon a priority system established by the 
students 

In general, single first-year nursing and medical 
students are assigned to F. W. Olin Hall, which is 
located at 445 East 69 Street, directly across from 
the Medical College entrance on York Avenue. Olin 
Hall contains a gymnasium, snack bar, lounge rooms, 
and 278 residence rooms. Each room is furnished as 
a single bedroom-study but, since two rooms share a 
connecting bath, they may be used as a suite for two 
students, if desired. The rooms are completely fur- 
nished and linen service is provided. Student rental 
for an academic year, which runs from August 29 to 
May 29, is $990. 

Jacob S. Lasdon House, located at 420 East 70 Street, 
provides fully furnished, carpeted, and air-conditioned 
apartments with kitchens, dining areas, living rooms, 
and baths for both second-year single and all married 
nursing students, as well as medical and graduate 
students registered in Cornell University Single 
students may share a one- or two-bedroom apartment 
By using the living room and the bedroom(s) as in- 
dividual bedroom-study rooms, two students may 
share a one-bedroom apartment and three students 
may share a two-bedroom apartment. Four single 
students may share a two-bedroom apartment if two 
students share each bedroom. There are a limited 
number of studio apartments for married students 
Married students without children will find the studio 
and one-bedroom apartments suitable. Married stu- 
dents with children will find the two-bedroom apart- 
ment more appropriate. The rents for the various units 
in Lasdon House range from $231 per month to $389 
per month for the 1977-78 academic year, which runs 
from August 29 to May 29. 

There are also some apartments available for married 
students in Livingston Farrand Apartments on 
69 Street 

Regulations 

Students signing leases for University housing must 
notify the appropriate office at least thirty days in 
advance of any move or change of roommate 

Students living a distance from the School should 
consider the time to be spent in commuting each day 



22 Facilities for Instruction 



Classes and clinical experience may be scheduled 
Monday through Saturday in a combination of hours 
that may begin as early as 7:30 a.m. and end as late 
as 9:00 p.m. 

All students must keep the Office of Records informed 
of their correct address and telephone number. The 
Student Handbook outlines the system used for dis- 
tribution of official School communications to students. 
Each student is expected to follow the procedure to 
avoid delay in responding to the communications. 

Recreational Facilities 

Because the School believes that the education of 
young men and women today includes healthful 
social relationships, provisions have been made to 
encourage the development of such relationships in 
the life of the student. 

A social committee is responsible for a full and varied 
social calendar that includes such activities as dances, 
coffee hours, and suppers. Other activities in which 
students may participate are the yearbook and singing 
groups. The director of student relations is available 
at all times to advise students in the organization of 
discussion groups and in the planning of social and 
cultural activities. University facilities shared for 
recreation must be reserved well in advance through 
the appropriate offices as noted in the Student 
Handbook. 

Health Services 

Personnel Health Service of The New York Hospital, 
located in J-1, provides comprehensive health care 
for students enrolled in the School. This includes a 
physical examination and routine tests following the 
initial registration in the School, an ongoing immuni- 
zation program, ambulatory medical care in the out- 
patient clinics, and, when indicated, admission to 
The New York Hospital. Only matriculated full-time 
students are eligible for these services. 

Health insurance is required. At registration, each 
student must either enroll in the Blue Cross/Blue 
Shield of Greater New York plan available at the 
School or provide evidence of equivalent health in- 
surance coverage and sign a waiver. For insurance 
coverage through the School, a fee will be charged 
each semester based on the current insurance rate. 
(See Expenses p. 16.) 

Students are expected to take corrective action for any 
health problems, including dental work, before regis- 
tration in the School. Any subsequent elective proce- 
dures are to be scheduled during vacation periods. 

If, in the opinion of the Personnel Health Service 
physician, the condition of a student's physical or 
emotional health makes it unwise for the student to 
remain in the program, the School authorities may 
require the student to withdraw either temporarily or 
permanently at any time. 

Counseling Services 

The School maintains active counseling services 
which are available to all students who need assist- 
ance, either in connection with routine matters that 



may come up in their work in the School or in connec- 
tion with special personal problems. 

The director of student relations assists students in 
every way possible in their educational, personal, and 
social adjustment, and cooperates with the faculty in 
helping students in these areas. The director also helps 
students to locate those members of the staff who are 
best qualified to be of assistance in relation to the 
particular problem at hand. 

Group therapy also is made available through the 
office of the director of student relations to assist 
students whose effectiveness and adjustment are im- 
paired by personal concerns. 



Division of Continuing 
Education 

The Division of Continuing Education is an organized 
educational unit of the School of Nursing under the 
administration of the dean. 

The division offers organized and planned presenta- 
tions of appropriate educational experiences at a 
professional level that are university oriented and 
related to the needs and purposes of the employment 
or practice situation. The programs offered by the 
division have their origins in selected areas of nursing 
practice. The objectives of the programs are directed 
toward enabling registered nurses, both in practice 
and returning to practice, to update and expand their 
knowledge and skills in circumscribed areas of clinical 
nursing practice. 

A variety of special workshops and formalized training 
programs are conducted cooperatively with the Cornell 
University Medical College; the professional staffs of 
The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center; the 
Department of Health, Health Services Administration 
of the City of New York; the Visiting Nurse Service of 
New York; and other cooperating community agencies. 

Information on programs being offered, applications, 
and fees may be obtained by writing to the Division 
of Continuing Education, 515 East 71 Street, New 
York, New York 10021. 



Facilities for Instruction 

The facilities of The New York Hospital-Cornell 
Medical Center provide the setting for the major part 
of the educational program offered to students in 
both divisions of the School of Nursing. The classroom 
and office facilities for the School are located at 515 
East 71 Street. In addition to the usual classroom and 
conference room facilities, there are audiovisual and 
learning laboratories for the practice of basic nursing 
skill. 

In order to meet the objectives of the program, the 
School of Nursing contracts with selected voluntary 
and government agencies for additional clinical ex- 
periences. It is a requirement of the program that 
each student participate in the care of patients in the 
community. Representatives of various government 
and voluntary agencies plan with the faculty for 



Facilities for Instruction 23 



appropriate ways to contribute to the student's knowl- 
edge of the community and the organization for 
human services Individuals who feel it would be 
difficult to travel within some parts of the New York 
City community and to participate fully in assigned 
experiences, should give thoughtful consideration to 
this before registering in the program of the School. 

The library, in the Samuel J Wood Library and Re- 
search Building at 1300 York Avenue, is shared by the 
students and the faculties of the School of Nursing and 
the Medical College and the staff of The New York 
Hospital 

The reading room of the library is located on the first 
floor Adjoining the reading room are the sections for 
current journals, reference works, and monographs. 
The book stacks and carrels are on two floors below 
the mam reading room. 1 ,600 current journals are 
received each year; the total collection has reached 
more than 100,000 volumes. 



The library also is equipped with a communication 
terminal linked to a computer to provide searches of 
the medical literature The Information and Reference 
Department receives requests for these searches 
Typing and duplicating services and, most importantly, 
a staff willing to help also are available 

The clinical nursing departments have small libraries 
containing literature pertaining especially to the sub- 
ject matter of the department These collections, 
interlibrary loans, and photoduplicate copies from 
other libraries, including the National Library of 
Medicine, supplement the main library 

All students have clinical experience on the patient 
units of The New York Hospital The Hospital com- 
prises five clinical departments— Medicine, Surgery, 
Lying-in Hospital, Pediatrics, and The Payne Whitney 
Clinic (psychiatry). Each of these units (largely self- 
contained) has facilities for inpatients and outpatients, 
and for teaching and conducting research The Hospi- 
tal has approximately 1,100 beds and 90 clinics. 



Cornell University 



Description of Courses 



Nursing Courses 



All academic courses of the University are open to 
students of all races, religions, ethnic origins, ages, 
sexes, and political persuasions. No requirement, 
prerequisite, device, rule, or other means shall be 
used by any employee of the University to encourage, 
establish, or maintain segregation on the basis of 
race, religion, ethnic origin, age, sex, or political 
persuasion in any academic course of the University. 

156 Introduction to the Nursing Process, Care 
of the Adult Patient Fall. Credit: five hours, theory; 
five hours, clinical laboratory. M. Sugimoto and 
faculty. 

The first unit focuses on the profession of nursing 
and the components of the nursing process. Se- 
lected cognitive, psychomotor, and interpersonal 
skills are presented. In the second unit, concepts 
essential to the nursing care of adult patients with 
representative medical-surgical health problems are 
studied Attention is given to the following param- 
eters of each health problem: epidemiology, pre- 
ventive measures, disease process, therapeutic 
regimens, and physical and psychosocial effects on 
the patient and family. Therapeutic nutrition and 
pharmacology are correlated with the health prob- 
lems. The influence of these factors on nursing 
judgments and actions is explored. Experience in 
the clinical laboratory provides opportunity to apply 
theoretical concepts and skills in caring for patients. 

157 Parent-Child Nursing Fall and spring 
Credit: five hours, theory; five hours, clinical labora- 
tory. Prerequisite: Nursing 156. Registration for this 
course is by advisement E. W. Haas and faculty. 
Emphasis is placed on nursing assessment and inter- 
vention in relation to health needs of women, their 
children, and the role of the father. Theory and 
practice related to social trends, family influences, 
and normal growth and development are integrated 
throughout the course Experiences are provided 

for the promotion and maintenance of optimal health 
to families in a variety of settings. 

160 Interpersonal Processes in Nursing Fall 
Credit: one hour. Prerequisites, psychology, three 
credits; sociology, three credits. L Schwager. 



Concepts of behavior, anxiety, socialization, dying, 
death, and grief are studied in the context of the 
nurse-patient relationship. Emphasis is on principles 
of communication and interviewing. The content is 
prerequisite to subsequent nursing courses 

256 Community Health: Care of Patients with 
Environmentally Related Health Problems Fall 
and spring. Credit: five hours, theory, five hours, 
clinical laboratory. Prerequisites: Nursing 156. 
Registration for this course is by advisement. D. Pearl- 
mutter and faculty. 

Focus is on the prevention and control of selected 
community health problems such as cerebral vascular 
accident, mental illness, and social problems such as 
addiction. The modality of nursing care will be both 
individual (therapeutic nurse-patient relationship) 
and group (family) in acute psychiatric hospital 
settings and the community. The common denomina- 
tor utilized in teaching the selected community 
health problems will be the epidemiological approach 
Experience is provided for students to observe and 
participate in group process 

257 Dimensions of Nursing Spring Credit 
four hours, theory; eight hours, clinical laboratory. 
Prerequisites: Nursing 156, 157 256, and 360 

J. B. Dorie and faculty. 

Selected aspects of professional nurse practice are 
studied: care of patients with multiple and complex 
needs, including those with cancer; sharing responsi- 
bility for nursing care of groups of patients; and 
participating in the leadership activities related to 
nursing care. A variety of settings will be used for 
clinical learning. 

360a Assessment of Health Status of Adults 

Summer, fall, intersession. and spring Credit two 
hours. Prerequisite: Biological Science 133; prerequi- 
site or concurrent enrollment in Biological Science 
136 Required: all students M Miller 
Supervised practice in techniques of observation, 
interviewing, percussion, palpation, and ausculta- 
tion with emphasis on normal ranges of the healthy 
individual. The course includes relevant anatomy, 
physiology, and pathology basic to understanding 
the significance of findings Four hours of combined 
conference and practice are required each week. 



26 Description of Courses 



360b Assessment of Health Status of Children 

Fall, intersession, and spring. Credit: One or two 
hours. Prerequisite: Biological Science 133; pre- 
requisite or concurrent enrollment in Biological 
Science 136. 

Supervised practice in techniques of observation, 
interviewing, percussion, palpation, and auscultation 
with emphasis on normal ranges of the healthy 
individual. The course includes relevant anatomy, 
physiology, and pathology basic to understanding the 
significance of findings. Four hours of combined 
conference and practice are required each week. 

365 Clinical Nursing— Acute Care of Children 
or Adults Fall. Credit: five hours. Prerequisite: 
Course 360 must be taken prior to or concurrently 
with this course. Required course: registered nurses 
not taking Course 366. Limited enrollment and by 
advisement. B. Friedman. 

Within this clinical experience core, the student has 
the opportunity to develop proficiency in the exer- 
cise of clinical judgment and skills requisite to the 
supportive management of children or adults who 
require continuous, comprehensive observation in an 
intensive or critical care environment. Opportunities 
are provided for systematic study in a clinical area 
of interest. The focus is on nursing functions, assess- 
ment and problem-related intervention through 
health counseling, health education, and preventive, 
restorative, and therapeutic measures. Associated 
seminars serve as a mode for extending the scope 
of knowledge and experience and for developing 
professional peer communication and decision- 
making skills. Fifteen hours of combined practice 
and correlated seminars are required each week. 

366 Clinical Nursing— Long-term or Chronic 
Illness of Children or Adults Fall Credit five 
hours. Prerequisite: Course 360 must be taken prior 
to or concurrently with this course. Required course: 
registered nurses not taking Course 365. Limited 
enrollment and by advisement. B. Friedman. 
Within this clinical experience core the student has 
the opportunity to develop proficiency in the exercise 
of clinical judgment and skills requisite to the sup- 
portive management of children or adults with long- 
term or progressive chronic illness. Opportunities 
are provided for systematic study in a clinical area 
of interest. The focus is on nursing functions: on 
assessment and problem-related intervention through 
health counseling, health education, and preventive, 
restorative, and therapeutic measures Associated 
seminars serve as a mode for extending the scope of 
knowledge and experience and for developing pro- 
fessional peer communication and decision-making 
skills. Fifteen hours of combined practice and cor- 
related seminars are required each week. 

367 Clinical Nursing— Primary Care of Children 
or Adults Spring. Credit: five hours. Prerequisite: 
Nursing 365 or 366. Required course: registered 
nurses. Limited enrollment and by advisement. 

B. Friedman. 

Within this clinical experience core the student has 
the opportunity to develop proficiency in the initial 
screening assessment of the psychosocial and physi- 
cal status of children or adults and responsibility of 



the continuum of care of selected patients within the 
protocols mutually agreed upon by medical and 
nursing personnel. Experiences offer opportunities 
for the reinforcement or development of skills in case 
finding, interpretation of selected laboratory tests, 
health counseling, health teaching and techniques of 
surveillance and management of care for the selected 
patients (children or adults) in ambulatory care set- 
tings. Associated seminars serve as a mode for ex- 
tending the scope of knowledge and experience and 
for developing professional peer communication and 
decision-making skills. Fifteen hours of combined 
practice and correlated seminars are required each 
week. 



Professionally Related Courses 

133 Biological Science Fall and spring. Credit: 
three hours. Required course: all students unless 
exempt by approved examination. V. Stolar. 

An introduction to the fundamental mechanisms of 
human physiology. The course progresses from the 
cell to the complexities of human control systems, 
utilizing at each level of increasing complexity the 
information and principles developed previously. 
This approach is based on the theme that all phe- 
nomena of life are ultimately describable in terms of 
physical and chemical laws. 

134 Biological Science Fall and spring. Credit: 
three hours. Prerequisite: Biological Science 133. 
Required prior to or concurrent with Nursing 157. 
R. S. Rubenstein. 

This course includes some aspects of human repro- 
ductive physiology; male and female anatomy, sex 
steroids, birth control, and maternal physiology. Also 
covered are principles of heredity and medical genet- 
ics. There will be a survey of pathogenic micro- 
organisms to acquaint the student with communicable 
diseases that are endemic and epidemic. 

136 Biological Science Fall and spring. Credit: 
three hours. Prerequisite: Biological Science 133. 
Required course: all students. V. Stolar. 
Morphological and functional study of the nervous 
system in man. Histology, neurotransmitters, gross 
anatomy, stimulus-response, and integrative control 
are covered. The physiology of striated, smooth, and 
cardiac muscle will be included. 

140 Pharmacology Fall and spring. Credit: two 
hours. Prerequisite: Nursing 156 or equivalent. Re- 
quired course: registered nurses; other students by 
advisement. R. Rubenstein. 

The emphasis of the course is on the basic principles 
of pharmacology. These principles are elaborated in 
discussion of drugs acting on selected physiological 
systems, such as the nervous and cardiovascular. Drug 
interactions will be included. 

247 Epidemiology Fall and spring. Credit: two 
hours. Required course: registered nurses; other stu- 
dents by advisement. R. S. Rubenstein. 
Introductory course in which the meaning and scope 
of epidemiology are considered. Relevant content is 
drawn from biostatistics, microbiology, environmental 



Description of Courses 27 



studies, and health service administration Particular 
emphasis is on scientific appraisal of the patterns of 
health and disease in society 

108 Introduction to Research Fall and spring 
Credit two hours Required course all students. 

E Smith 

Introduction to skills requisite to critical review of 

published research in the health field The purpose 

of the course is to develop intelligent consumers of 

research 

109 Life-span Growth and Development, Part I 

Fall Credit two hours. Required course all students 
unless exempt by school approved examination 
Faculty to be appointed 

Study of the critical stages and periods in the life 
cycle from birth through adolescent years Discussion 
of psychophysiological and psychosocial factors that 
produce a range of human behavior will be based on 
work of theorists such as Piaget, Enckson, and Freud. 

110 Life-span Growth and Development, Part II 

Spring Credit two hours Prerequisite. 109 Life- 
span Growth and Development or by permission of 
instructor Required course: all students D Schwartz 
Theories and concepts relevant to the biological, 
psychological, and sociological aspects of aging. 
Emphasis is placed on the normal aging process; the 
significance of the usual life style of the individual 
and the potential consequences of interaction with 
physical and social environment; developmental 
tasks and attitudes toward aging of individuals and 
society 

207 Nursing In the Social Order Fall and spring 
Credit two hours Required course: all students. 
L Schwager 

The structure and function of both formal and infor- 
mal social organizations are considered, especially 
as they influence the work of the professional nurse 
m the delivery of health services 

Spanish for Health Professionals Spring. Credit: 
two hours Prerequisite: one year of Spanish or the 
equivalent and pretesting for section assignment. 
Elective Faculty to be appointed. 
The course assists the person already familiar with 
Spanish to develop skills in conversation as it relates 
to health care services 

Women's Health Spring Credit: two hours, theory; 
one hour, clinical practicum (elective) Prerequisite: 
Nursing 157 and Biological Science 134 or its equiv- 
alent or permission of the instructor Elective: limited 
enrollment E Smith and R. Rubenstem 
An advanced seminar course in selected topics regard- 
ing the health care of women. Topics to be included 



are health maintenance for women, gynecological 
problems; adolescent services, population and epi- 
demiological approaches to identifying problem 
areas in women's health, and the influence of the 
women's movement on health care services to women 
A contract between the students and the faculty 
will be negotiated regarding the topics to be covered 
Class participation, individual and/or group projects, 
and a paper will be required 

Food and Nutrition for Health Spring Credit 
two hours Prerequisite Nursing 156 or its equiva- 
lent and Biological Science 133 or its equivalent 
prior to or concurrently with this course Elective 
limited enrollment D. Erlander 
A study of the multiple factors, such as culture, 
religious-philosophic orientation, and health status, 
that affect food intake Experience will be gained in 
assessing food intake with emphasis on helping 
individuals sustain or alter their eating patterns to 
promote quality of life. Attention will be focused on 
normal nutrition with or without modified diets 

Independent Study Offers the student an opportu- 
nity to delineate an area of interest for guided, system- 
atic study under the sponsorship of a faculty member 
Planned essentially for the winter mtersession or 
summer session, on- or off-campus study is possible 
for credit ranging from one to four hours Registration 
by endorsement of a faculty sponsor D. Pearlmutter, 
E. Smith, and selected faculty 

Guided Study Offers qualified students an oppor- 
tunity to participate in a specially designed program 
of study and course visitation under the direction of a 
faculty member. It permits participation in classes, 
seminars, conferences, library research, and selected 
nursing service programs Offered during the regular 
term dates or in January May be taken for credit or 
no credit Request for attendance is filed in the Office 
of the Dean. A special fee is established after consul- 
tation with the dean 

Clinical Nursing Practicum— Selected Health 
Problems of Children or Adults January inter- 
session. Credit: none Professors of clinical practice 
and clinical preceptors 

A clinical practice experience in the assessment, 
planning, provision, and evaluation of nursing care 
for patients in selected patient care settings of The 
New York Hospital. Nursing Service personnel, 
head nurses, or clinical specialists will function as 
preceptors A three-week period of practice and 
seminars is required Student placement for clinical 
experience is dependent upon restrictions that relate 
to patient care services, the availability of nursing 
service personnel resources, and nursing service 
administrative policies. Priority is given to senior 
students 







4 



• 



: *«- 




Cornell University 



Register 



University Administration 

Frank H. T. Rhodes, President of the University 
Dale R. Corson, Chancellor of the University 
David C. Knapp. University Provost 
Theodore Cooper. Dean of the Medical College and 

Provost for Medical Affairs 
William G. Herbster. Senior Vice President 
Mark Barlow, Jr., Vice Provost 
Constance E Cook, Vice President for Land-grant 

Affairs 
W Donald Cooke. Vice President for Research 
June M Fessenden-Raden, Vice Provost 
William D. Gurowitz, Vice President for Campus 

Affairs 
Robert T Horn, Vice President and Treasurer 
Samuel A. Lawrence, Vice President for Financial 

and Planning Services 
E Hugh Luckey, Vice President for Medical Affairs 
Robert M Matyas, Vice President for Facilities and 

Business Operations 
Paul L. McKeegan, Vice Provost 
Richard M. Ramin, Vice President for Public Affairs 
Byron W Saunders, Dean of the University Faculty 
Neal R Stamp, University Counsel and Secretary of 

the Corporation 



The New York Hospital- 
Cornell Medical Center 
Administration 

E. Hugh Luckey, M.D., President 
Eamon Brennan, Vice President for Public Affairs 
Roger H Sheldon, Vice President for Planning 
Stephen J Smallwood. Vice President for 
Development 



The New York Hospital 
Administration 

David D Thompson, M.D., Director 

Melville A. Piatt, M.D.. Executive Associate Director, 

Professional Services 
Eleanor C Lambertsen. Ed D.. Senior Associate 

Director, Nursing Services 



Julius D'Elia, Senior Associate Director, 

Administrative and Engineering Services 
Richard A. Berman, Associate Director, Ambulatory 

Services 
H. Henry Bertram, Associate Director, Personnel 

Services 
Cosmo J. LaCosta. Associate Director, General 

Services 
Frank P. Ravenna, Associate Director, Financial 

Services 
H. Mefford Runyon. Associate Director, Corporate 

Affairs 
Anne A Cote. Assistant to the Director 



Joint Administrative Board 

Representatives from the Board of 
Trustees of Cornell University 

Dale R. Corson, Chairman 1978 
Arthur H. Dean 
Robert W. Purcell 
Harold D. Uris 

Representatives from the Board of 
Governors of the Society of the 
New York Hospital 

Stanley DeJ. Osborne. Chairman 1977 
Kenneth H. Hannan 
Frederick K. Trask, Jr. 
John Hay Whitney 

Members-at-Large 

E. Roland Harriman 
Walter B. Wriston 

Ex Officio Member 

E. Hugh Luckey. M.D 

Officers of the School 

Frank H T. Rhodes, Ph.D.. President of the 

University 
Dale R Corson. Chancellor of the University 
David C Knapp. Ph.D., Provost of the University 



30 Register 



Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D.. D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor of 

Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, MA, R.N., Associate Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Nina T. Argondizzo, MA, R.N., Assistant Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Helen M. Berg, Ed.D., R.N., Assistant Dean 

Faculty and Staff 

Administration 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor of 

Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Nina T. Argondizzo; M.A., R.N., Assistant Dean and 

Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Helen M. Berg, Ed.D., R.N., Assistant Dean 
Meimi Joki, A.B., Assistant to the Dean 
Edna Johnson, Director of Student Relations 
Judith A. Court, M.A., Director of Admissions and 

Student Records 

Undergraduate Faculty 

Eddie Mae Barnes, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing; Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney 

Psychiatric Clinic 
Mary T. Bielski, MA, R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, 

Medical Nursing 
Marion Peters Braxton, M.P.H., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Sarah E. Cook, MA, R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Margaret Cotterell, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Sister Catherine M. Cummings, M.S.N., R.N., Assis- 
tant Professor of Nursing 
Lynne J. Dawson, M.P.H., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Margot R. DeSevo, A.M., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Jeanne B. Dorie, MA, R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing, Clinical Nursing Department Head, 

Operating Room Nursing 
I. Darlene Erlander, M.A., R.D., Assistant Professor of 

Nutrition 
Bonnie Jones Friedman, M.A., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 
Elenora Haas, M.S., R.N., C.N.M., Assistant Professor 
• of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing, Associate Dean 
Ann Keith-Kurtis, MA, R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Katherine A. Knight, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Professor of Nursing, Dean of the School of Nursing 
Martha A. McNiff, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 



Agnes E. Morgan, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Deanna R. Pearlmutter, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Bernice Horner-Rosner, M.S.N., R.N., Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Nursing 

Reva Scharf Rubenstein, Ph.D., Associate Professor 
of Science 

Lois Schwager, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing 

Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor of 
Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, 
Surgical Nursing 

Elisabeth Dorsey Ivey Smith, Ed.D., R.N., Associate 
Professor of Nursing 

Vera Stolar, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor of Science 

Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant Professor 
of Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, 
Obstetrics-Gynecology and Pediatrics 

Madeleine S. Sugimoto, M.Ed., M.A., R.N., Assistant 
Professor of Nursing 

Janet Swanson, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 

Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 
Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, Out- 
patient Department 



Continuing Education Faculty 

Nina T. Argondizzo, MA, R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing; Assistant Dean 
Rachel Ayers, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor, 

Memorial Division of Nursing 
Eddie Mae Barnes. M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing; Director of Nursing, Payne Whitney 

Psychiatric Clinic 
Mary Bartlett, M.S., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Mary T. Bielski, MA, R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, Baker 

Pavilion Nursing Service 
Barbara Boyce, MA, R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Amy Chou, MA, R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Edna Danielsen, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Virginia C. Dericks, MA, R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Dorothy Ellison, MA, R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, 

Operating Room Nursing 
Joanne Foster, MA, R.N., Administrative Liaison, 

Assistant Director of Nursing Service 
Geraldine K. Glass, MA, R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing 
Alene Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Christina L. Haas, MA, R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Mary Herbermann, R.N., Assistant in Instruction 
Alice Hugo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Patricia Jones, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Helen King, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of Nursing 
Martha Leonard, M.N., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Emelia Luddy-Turner, MA, R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Patricia Mahoney, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Margery Manly, MA, R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Manorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N., Associate Professor of 

Nursing 



Register 31 



Grace Moroukian. MA , R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Margaret J. O'Brien, MA. MP H , R.N . Adjunct 

Assistant Professor 
Patricia M O'Regan, M.A., R.N.. Instructor m Nursing 
Susan Papera. MA. C N M , Instructor 
Lena J. Saffioti. MA., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Adele Schlosser. M.P.H . R.N., Adjunct Assistant 

Professor 
Dons Schwartz. MA, R.N , Associate Professor of 

Nursing 
Carol Shanik, MS. R.N.. Instructor in Nursing 
Laura L Simms, Ed D , R.N , Associate Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, 

Surgical Nursing 
Mane D Strickland. M Ed.. R.N., Assistant Professor 

of Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, 

Obstetncs-Gynecology and Pediatrics 
Grace Sullivan. B.S.N.. R.N.. Assistant in Instruction 
Barbara Topf-Olstein, MA., R.N., Instructor 
Carolyn E Wagner. M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, Out- 
patient Department 

Emeritus Professors 

Muriel R. Carbery, M.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Virginia M Dunbar, MA, R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing and Dean Emeritus 
Verda F. Hickox, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Mary Klein, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeritus of Nursing 
Margery T. Overholser, R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Bessie A. R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 
Veronica Lyons Roehner, M.A., R.N., Professor Emeri- 
tus of Nursing 
Hendenka J. Rynbergen, M.S., Professor Emeritus of 

Science 

Class of 1978 

The name of the student is followed by his or her home 
address. The college or university from which the 
student transferred is given in parentheses 

Program for College Graduates 

Amand, Robert, Arlington. Massachusetts (University 

of Massachusetts) 
Askue, Elizabeth, Providence, Rhode Island (Brown 

University) 
Balmir. Roselyne. Cambria Heights, New York (City 

College of New York) 
Barton, Louise. Bronxville, New York (University of 

Denver) 
Bauer, Barbara, Berkeley, California (University 

of California at Berkeley) 
Bent. Lisa. Ashburham. Massachusetts (Middlebury 

College) 
Bentley. Lawrence. Whitestone. New York (Queens 

College) 
Blythe. Marguerite. New York. New York (Barnard 

College) 



Borzam, Nancy. New Haven, Connecticut (Holy 

Cross College) 
Brown, David, Fulton, New York (Wagner College) 
Brown. Lynn, Blasdell. New York (Colgate University) 
Buchalski, Kathryn. Brooklyn. New York (State 

University of New York at Albany) 
Byerly. Ann. Lincoln, Nebraska (Coe College) 
Cahill. Mary, Jackson Heights, New York (College of 

Mount Saint Vincent) 
Carroll, Barbara. Oakland. California (University 

of California at Berkeley) 
Charnock, Roberta. Brandon, Vermont (Kalamazoo 

College) 
Cheely, Carole, New York, New York (Syracuse 

University) 
Cooperman, Ellen. Flushing. New York (State 

University of New York at Stony Brook) 
Csinsi. John, Newmgton, Connecticut (Central 

Connecticut State College) 
Cummins, Elaine, Queens Village. New York (Queens 

College) 
de Mille, Polly, Milton, Massachusetts (Mount Hol- 

yoke College) 
DiCioccio, Linda, New York, New York (Columbia 

University) 
Dillman, Linda, Hollis Hills, New York (Ithaca 

College) 
Dorsey, Jean, New York, New York (Kirkland College) 
Ehrhch, Carol. Brooklyn, New York (State University 

of New York, College at Cortland) 
Ernst, Carol. New York, New York (Connecticut 

College) 
Fennell, Kim, Stratford, Connecticut (Colby College) 
Fisher, Phoebe, Sharon, Connecticut. (Tufts 

University) 
Fralich, Deborah, Cape Elizabeth, Maine (Smith 

College) 
Frankel, Judith, North Babylon, New York (William 

Smith College) 
Garntt, Marcie. New York, New York (Wilson College) 
Giaccio, Frances, Flushing, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Giles. Wendy. Aurora, Colorado (University of 

Colorado) 
Golub. Carolyn, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 

College) 
Golz, Catherine, Chicago, Illinois (University of 

Colorado) 
Greenberg. Jean. Elmhurst, New York (Bernard 

Baruch College) 
Greenberg. Phyllis, West Hartford, Connecticut 

(University of Hartford) 
Grennen, Jean, Bellerose, New York (Fordham 

University) 
Grossman. Andrea, New York, New York (State 

University of New York at Buffalo) 
Grow. Susan, Brookline. Massachusetts (Grmnell 

College) 
Guida. Linda, Jamaica. New York (State University of 

New York at Buffalo) 
Hubbard. Nancy. New York. New York (McGill 

University) 
Kaplan, Beryl. New York. New York (Barnard College) 
Katzm. Anne. Litchfield, Connecticut (Beloit College) 
Kedzielawa. Carol. Poughkeepsie. New York (State 

University of New York at Albany) 
King. Stephanie. Brooklyn, New York (Hunter 

College) 



32 Register 



Konefal, Tanya, Fayetteville, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Kotelnikoff, Diane, Oakland, California (Stanford 

University) 
Leene, Anne, Rochester, New York (Rochester 

Institute of Technology) 
Lewis, Susan, Garrison, New York (Cornell University) 
Linker, Jane, Lynchburg, Virginia (Saint Olaf College) 
MacDougall, Nancy, Madison, New Jersey (Temple 

University) 
Margolis, Barbara, New York, New York (Eastman 

School of Music) 
Michaels, Nancy, Brooklyn, New York (Cornell 

University) 
O'Donnell, Suzanne, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 

College) 
Oliver, Charlene, Woodside, New York (State 

University of New York at Binghamton) 
Ormsby, Joan, Bronx, New York (Herbert Lehman 

College) 
Pastorfield, Ann, North Haven, Connecticut (Elmira 

College) 
Phillips, Susan, Los Angeles, California (University 

of Southern California) 
Phipps, Patricia, Brooklyn, New York (Simmons 

College) 
Reith, Marianne, Gainesville, Florida (University of 

Florida) 
Rosenbluth, llene, Fresh Meadows, New York (State 

University of New York at Buffalo) 
Rosenthal, Robin, New Brunswick, New Jersey 

(Douglas College) 
Rosselot, Gail, Sunnyside, New York (Dickinson 

College) 
Roston, Margaret, Hewlett, New York (Cornell 

University) 
Rubin, Phyllis, Baldwin, New York (State University 

of New York at Buffalo) 
Seelig, Patricia, New York, New York (Hofstra 

University) 
Stanley, Susan, New York, New York (Wellesley 

College) 
Steel, Jane, Buffalo, New York (Goucher College) 
Stiefel, Regina, New York, New York (Georgetown 

University 
Sumi, Martha, Racine, Wisconsin (University of 

Wisconsin) 
Tabak, Minda, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 

College) 
Teikmanis, Mahra, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

(University of Massachusetts) 
Torok, Sr. Irene, Bloomfield, New Jersey (College of 

Saint Elizabeth) 
Tranchino, Dawn, Northport, New York (State Uni- 
versity of New York at Stony Brook) 
Trott, Mary, Bethel, Vermont (University of Vermont) 
Valentine, Mary Jane, New Hyde Park, New York 

(Holy Cross College) 
Vinci, Vanessa, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan 

(University of Michigan) 
Vitkus. James, Binghamton, New York (State Uni- 
versity College at Oswego) 



Walsh, Sr. Monica, Bronx, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Waterfield, Patricia, Brighton, Massachusetts 

(Skidmore College) 
Whipple, Susan, Grafton, Massachusetts (Middlebury 

College) 
Will, Linsey, New York, New York (Oberlin College) 
Winkler, Katherine, Austin, Texas (University of 

Texas) 
Young, Judith, New York, New York (Florida State 

University) 
Zukof, Ronda, Bayside, New York (State University 

of New York at Albany) 



Registered Nurse Students 

Addessi, Adrienne, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Bilog, Aida, New York, New York (University of 

Santo Tomas) 
Cha, Eun Sook, Long Island City, New York (Mary- 
mount Manhattan College) 
Chantanakom, Nongyao, New York. New York 

(Hunter College) 
Conyers, Hope, New York, New York (Hunter College) 
Cosgrove, Mary, New York, New York (Bronx 

Community College) 
Emanuel, Harriet, New York, New York (Queens- 
borough Community College) 
Esteves, Raymond, Woodside, New York (Queens- 
borough Community College) 
Frederick, Nancy, New York, New York (Suffolk 

County Community College) 
Herberman, Mary, New York, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Kasemsawat, Chongkol, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Lang, Cheryl, Bronx, New York (Lehman College) 
Lannen, Eleanor, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
LaRocca, Theresa, New York, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Lubansky, Stasi, New York, New York (Hunter College) 
Mallahan-Reebe, Jean, New York, New York (Staten 

Island Community College) 
Mazzarulli, Rosalie, Bronx, New York (Hunter 

College) 
McCaughley, Ellen, New York, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Moscati, Joan, New York, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Quesada, Ofelia, New York, New York (University of 

the Philippines) 
Ricketts, Linda, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn 

College) 
Seddio, Nancy, New York, New York (C. W. Post 

College) 
Stephens, Myrna, Brooklyn, New York (Manhattan 

Community College) 
Watson, Kathlyn, New York, New York (Englewood 

Cliffs College) 







A 


w I 


1 '1 

1 



Cornell University 



Index 



Academic Calendar, 2-3 

Academic standing, 15 

Acceptance, dates of, 1 4; fee, 1 7 

Accreditation, 8 

Administration, University, 29; School, 30 

Admission, 13-14; general requirements, 13; College 

Graduate Program, 14; Registered Nurse 

Program, 13-14 
Applications, 14: dates for filing, 14; fee, 17 
Assessment of Health Status of Adults, 25 
Assessment of Health Status of Children. 26 
Auditing of courses, 1 5; fee, 1 7 

Baccalaureate Degree Program for Registered 

Nurses, 11,13 
Bills, payment of, 1 7 
Biological science courses, 26 

Calendar, 2-3 

Care of the Adult Patient, 25 

Changes in program of study, 15 

Class of 1978,31-32 

Clinical facilities, 22 

Clinical Nursing— Acute Care of Children or 

Adults, 26 
Clinical Nursing— Long-term Care or Chronic Illness 

of Children or Adults, 26 
Clinical Nursing— Primary Care of Children or Adults, 

26 
Clinical Nursing Practicum, 27 
College Graduate Program, 10-11,13-14 
College Scholarship Service, 19 
Community Health, 25 
Continuing Education, Division of, 22 
Cornell Medical Center, 29; Joint Board, 29 
Cornell University administration, 29 
Counseling services, 22 
Courses, 25-27; plan for college graduates, 11; 

plan for registered nurses, 11,13 

Dean's List. 15-16 

Degree, requirements, 16; with distinction, 16 

Department of Health, 22 

Dimensions of Nursing, 25 

Dismissal, 16 

Division of Continuing Education, 22 

Epidemiology, 26-27 

Exemption of courses, examination, 15 

Expenses, 16-17 



F. W. Olin Hall, 21 

Facilities, clinical, 22-23; housing, 21: for 

instruction, 22-23; recreational, 22 
Faculty administration, 20; continuing education, 

30-31; emeritus, 31; undergraduate, 30 
Fees. 16-17; special, 17; course. 17 
Financial assistance, 19, 21; application for, 19; 

dates for administering, 1 9 
Food and Nutrition for Health, 27 
Foundations of nursing. 25 
Full-time study, 16 

Grades, 14-15 
Grants, 19, 21 
Guided study, 27 

Health services, 22 
History of School, 7-8 
Honor Society, 16 

Housing, costs, 21; information, 21; regulations, 
21-22 

Independent study, 27 

Information, visit for, 14 

Instruction facilities, 22 

Instructors, 30 

Interpersonal Processes in Nursing, 25 

Introduction to Nursing. 25 

Introduction to Research, 27 

Jacob S. Lasdon House, 21 
Joint Administration Board, 29 

Late registration fee. 1 7 

Library. 23 

Life-span Growth and Development, 27 

Living out, 21-22 

Loans, 19, 21 

Matriculated student, 15 

New York Hospital. 7; administration, 29; facilities 

for instruction, 22 
Nonmatriculated student, 15 
Nursing courses, 25-27 
Nursing in the Social Order, 27 
Nursing major, 10-11. 13 

Objectives, 8 
Organization, Student, 21 



Index 35 



Parent-Child Nursing. 25 

Part-time study. 1 7 

Pharmacology. 26 

Philosophy. 8 

Professors, emeritus 31 

Program for College Graduates. 10-11 

Program for Registered Nurses. 11.13 

Recreational faciltiies. 22 

Refunds. 19 

Register. 29-32 

Registered Nurse Program. 11.13 

Registration, late fee. 17; state. 16 

Reinstatement fee. 1 7 

Requirements, general. 13-14. degree, li 

Research. Introduction to. 27 

Scholarships. 19. 21 
School Organization. 21 



Sigma Theta Tau. 16 
Social Order, Nursing in the. 27 
Social science courses, 27 
Spanish for Health Professionals. 27 
State registration for graduates 1 6 
Students. 31-32 

Transfer fee. 1 7 

Tuition. 16-17 

Tuition Assistance Program, 21 

Undergraduate program. 8. 10-11 13 

Visiting nurse. 22 
Visits to the School. 14 

Withdrawal. 16; refund for. 19 
Women's Health. 27 



List of Announcements 

Following is a list of Announcements published by 
Cornell University to provide information on pro- 
grams, faculty, facilities, curricula, and courses of 
the various academic units. 

Agriculture and Life Sciences at Cornell 
College of Architecture, Art, and Planning 
College of Arts and Sciences: Introduction 
Graduate School of Business and Public 

Administration 
Engineering at Cornell 

Graduate Study in Engineering and Applied Sciences 
General Information* 
Graduate School 
School of Hotel Administration 
Human Ecology 
School of Industrial and Labor Relations: 

ILR at Cornell 

Graduate Study at ILR 
Law School 

Medical College (New York City) 
Graduate School of Medical Sciences (New York City) 
Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 

Nursing (New York City) 
Officer Education (ROTC) 
Summer Session 
New York State College of Veterinary Medicine 

* The Announcement of General Information is 
designed to give prospective students pertinent in- 
formation about all aspects and academic units of the 
University. 

In addition to the Announcements listed above, the 
University publishes a master catalog of University 
courses, Cornell University: Description of Courses. 

Requests for the publications listed above should be 
addressed to 

Cornell University Announcements 

Edmund Ezra Day Hall 

Ithaca, New York 14853 

(The writer should include a zip code.) 



The University does not discriminate against quali- 
fied handicapped persons in its admissions or 
recruitment activities. 



Office of University Publications 
877 2.5M Hu 









SUPPLEMENT TO 1977-1978 ANNOUNCEMENT 



Cornell University-New York Hospital School of Nursing 

515 East 71 Street 

New York, New York 10021 



IMPOPvTANT NOTICE 

The baccalaureate degree programs described in the 
catalog and supplement will be discontinued in June, 
1979. Applicants are no longer being admitted to 
the program for college graduates and program for 
registered nurses. 

Supplement Prepared by The Cornell University - 

New York Hospital 
School of Nursing 
August, 1978 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



The sections appearing in this supplement which 

ft 



replace the comparable sections of the 1977-1978 



Announcement are: 

Academic Calendar 1 

Expenses 4 

Financial Aid 8 

Housing 17 

Description of Courses 19 

Register 27 



which did not appear in the 1977-1978 Announcement 



The following sections appearing in this supplement 
which did not ap] 
have been added: 

Student Retention Information 



Note: 

1. The following sections of the 1977-1978 
Announcement will be in effect for the 1978-1979 
school year: 

History of the School 

Accreditation 

The Undergraduate Program 

Admission Requirements 

Grades and Academic Standing 

Degree Requirements 

State Registration for Graduates 

School Organization 

Recreational Facilities 

Health Service 

Counseling Services 

Dvision of Continuing Education 

Facilities for Instruction 

2. The application dates section of the 1977-1978 
Announcement is no longer in effect. No 
applicants to the program for college graduates 
were admitted after September, 1977 and no 
applicants to the program for registered nurses 
were admitted after January 1978. 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 



1978-1979 

Labor Day holiday 

Fall term instruction begins, 
all classes 8:00 A.M. 

School holiday 

Midsemester grades due, 
12 Noon 



Monday, September 4 
Tuesday, September 5 

Monday, October 9 
Friday, November 3 



Preregistration for intersession November 13-17 
and spring semester, continuing 
students 

Thanksgiving recess: 

Instruction suspended, 1:00 P.M. Wednesday, November 22 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 A.M. Monday, November 27 

Fall term instruction ends, Friday, December 15 
5:00 P.M. 

Final examinations and clinical Monday, December 18 
evaluation begin, 9:00 A.M. 

Final examinations and clinical Wednesday, December 20 
evaluation end, 5:00 P.M. 



Christmas recess begins, 
5:00 P.M. 

Intersession begins 9:00 A.M. 

Intersession ends, 5:00 P.M. 

- 1 - 



Wednesday, December 20 

Monday, January 8 
Friday, January 26, 1979 



Spring term instruction begins Monday, January 29 
all classes, 8:00 A.M. 



School holiday 



Monday, February 19 



Spring recess: 

Instruction suspended, 5:00 P.M. Friday, March 16 

Instruction resumed, 7:30 A.M. Monday, March 26 



Midsemester grades due, 
5:00 P.M. 

Spring term instruction ends, 
5:00 P.M. 

Final examinations and clinical 
evaluation begin, 1:00 P.M. 

Final examinations and clinical 
evaluation end, 5:00 P.M. 

Convocation and Commencement 



Thursday, April 5 
Friday, May 11 
Monday, May 14 
Wednesday, May 16 
Wednesday, May 23 



The dates shown in the Academic Calendar are subject 
to change at any time by official action of Cornell 
University. 

In enacting this calendar, the University has 
scheduled classes on religious holidays. It is the 
intent of the University that students missing 
classes due to the observance of religious holidays 
be given ample opportunity to make up work. 



STUDENT RETENTION INFORMATION 

In the fall 1975 semester 106 full time students 
entered the undergraduate program. Of these, 103 
were still enrolled at the end of the Spring 1976 
semester. One hundred two of these students, or 
96% of the cohort that began the program in 1975, 
graduated in June 1977. In addition one student 
completed the program in 1978. 

In the fall 1976 semester 97 full time students 
entered the underg -J -.ate program. Of these, 87 
were still enrolled at the end of the Spring 1977 
semester. Eighty-five of these students, or 88% 
of the initial cohort completed the program in 1978. 

EXPENSES 

The costs of attending the School of Nursing fall 
into two general categories. The first category 
includes certain fixed charges for tuition, fees, and 
charges for services provided by the School. The 
second category includes living costs and items of 
personal expense. To help students prepare their 
individual budgets an estimated budget is published. 
Although expenses, excluding fixed fees, vary for the 
individual student, the estimated budget reflects 
the usual expenses for single, full-time students 
living in University housing. 

Estimated expenses for the academic year include: 
Item Amount 



*Tuition 


$3000. 


Fees 


125. 


Books and Supplies 


300. 


**Health Insurance 


250. 


Liability Insurance 


25. 


Transportation (Clinical) 


150. 


Housing 


1375, 


Food, Household Supplies 


1500. 


Personal Expenditure 


1000. 


- 4 . 


$7725. 



^Tuition: A semester of full-time study consists 
of 12-18 credit hours of course work. This may 
be any combination of required, elective, or audited 
courses. The full tuition will be charged and 
there will be no prorated refund for courses dropped 
or exempted; nor will there be an additional charge 
for electives added within this number of credit 
hours . 

**Health insurance: Each student is required to be 
enrolled in a health insurance plan. An associated 
hospital plan is available to all students in the 
Medical Center. Students will be exempt from en- 
rollment in the Center plan if they give evidence 
of carrying comparable health insurance and sign 
a waiver to that effect at the time of admission 
and every semester thereafter while registered in 
the School, Students enrolled in the plan available 
at the Medical Center will be billed each semester. 
These charges will appear as a separate item on the 
bill and will reflect the current insurance rates. 
Questions concerning waivers or billing should be 
discussed with the assistant to the dean, S1030, 

A semester of part-time study consists of eleven 
or fewer credit hours of course work. This may 
be any combination of required and elective courses. 
The maximum number of credits to be taken by an 
individual registered for part-time study will be 
by advisement. Tuition of $100 per credit hour 
will be charged, 

FEES 

LATE REGISTRATION FEE. A fee of $5 is charged to 
each late registrant. First-semester registration 
closes at 5 p.m. on September 1, 1978, Second- 
semester registration closes at 5 p,m. on Friday, 
January 25, 1979. 



- 5 



FEE FOR AUDITING A COURSE. There will be no charge 
for full-time students. Part-time students will 
be charged $45 for the privilege of receiving the 
course outline, the bibliography, and attending 
selected classes. 

COURSE FEES 

Certain nonrefundable fees are charged during the 
semester in which a student is registered for the 
designated course. (See course fee schedule below) 
This fee covers the use of school equipment and 
supplies necessary for meeting the objectives of 
the courses. In certain instances there will be 
an additional charge for items lost or damaged. 



COURSE FEE SCHEDULE 



Additional charges 



Course 






Nonrefundable fee 


for loss or damage 


N 157 






$ 5 




Denver Develop- 
mental kits 


N 256 






$ 5 




Sphygmomanometer 
and cuff supplies 
in public health 
bag 


N 257 






Charges 


depend 


Charges depend on 








on selection of 


selection of final 








final cl 


.inical 


clinical experience 








experience 




N 360a 






$10 




Assessment bag and 


N 36 Ob 






$10 




any part of contents 


N 365 or 


N 


366 


$ 5 




none 


N 367 






$ 5 




none 


Epidemiology 


$ 8 




none 



PAYMENT OF BILLS 

Bills for fixed charges are distributed approximately 
two weeks prior to each semester. The bill is due 
and payable the first day of each semester, unless 
special arrangements have been made with the School. 

••6 • 



The amount, time, and manner of payment of tuition, 
fees, or other charges may be changed at any time 
without notice. Students who have questions re- 
garding their bills or the payment of grants or 
loans should see the assistant to the dean, S1030. 

Provision is made for the payment of bills at the 
beginning of each semester. Financial assistance 
awarded by the School, except loans, will be 
applied directly to the fixed charges. No re- 
imbursement of assistance offered as a grant is 
anticipated unless the student voluntarily leaves 
the School during the course of a semester. In 
this case, a proportionate amount of the grant, 
not to exceed one -half, is to be reimbursed. 

In order for a student to remain in good standing, 
receive an honorable withdrawal from the School, 
or participate in the commencement exercises, all 
bills must be paid and satisfactory arrangements 
made for the future repayment of loans. Any 
student who registers for a semester and then 
withdraws before the semester bill is paid must 
make a satisfactory settlement of tuition and 
fees due before the withdrawal form can be signed. 

A student completes arrangement for a loan 
authorized by the School by signing a note and 
receiving the check during the bill paying period. 
The proceeds of a loan must be applied to the 
balance due on School charges. They may not 
be claimed as a credit on the bill. 

REFUNDS 

Part of the tuition will be refunded to students 
who officially withdraw during the first half of 
the semester. The refund will be based on a 
deduction of 10 percent a week on all charges as 
of the first day of the semester. No refund will 
be made after the midsemester. 



In the event of the death of a student, refunds on 
tuition will be determined by the proration of the 
bills on a daily basis. 

FINANCIAL AID 

In general, students plan to meet the cost of their 
education through self-help (loans and employment). 
To the extent that is possible, parents and spouse 
are expected to contribute to the cost of a student's 
education. 

The Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing participates in the College Scholarship 
Service (CSS) of the College Entrance Examination 
Board. Participants in CSS subscribe to the 
principle that the amount of financial aid granted 
a student should be based upon financial need. The 
CSS assists colleges and universities and other 
agencies in determining the student's need for 
financial aid. Each student who seeks financial 
aid is required to submit a copy of the Financial 
Aid Form to the College Scholarship Service designat- 
ing Cornell University-New York Hospital School of 
Nursing as the recipient. 

APPLICATION FOR FINANCIAL AID 

Students who need financial aid should obtain a 
CSS Financial Aid Form and a Financial Aid Applica- 
tion from S1030. An appointment should be scheduled 
xvith the chairperson of the committee to discuss 
ttffe'Miature of the financial problem if an applica- 
tion is made after the March 1 closing' date for 
filing requests. 

^l!1 students, whether receiving financial aid or not 
whose financial situations change during an academic 
year, should feel free to discuss their problems 
with the chairperson of the committee. 



8 



FINANCIAL AID AWARDS 

Awards for the academic year are made the 
previous April. The financial aid committee meets 
periodically during the school year and reviews 
requests which have been made after the posted 
filing date. 

SCHOLARSHIP AND GRANT AID 
ADMINISTERED BY THE SCHOOL 

Vivian B, Allen Scholarship Fund. Established 

as an endowed fund by gifts from the Vivian B # 

Allen Foundation, Inc., income from which is 

used to provide scholarship aid annually for 

one or more students in need of financial assistance 

Allstate Foundation Grant . A grant is made 
available to the School each year to assist 
a student throughout the program. 

Juliette E. Blohme Scholarship Fund . Established 
as an endowed fund by Dr. and Mrs. George H. 
Van Emburgh as a memorial to Juliette E. Blohme 
of the class of 1922 through a gift of $6,000, 
the interest on which may be used in whole or 
in part each year. 

Fund of the Committee for Scholarships . A fund, 
established and maintained by a committee of 
women interested in the School of Nursing to 
assist students who need financial help in 
order to prepare for nursing. Awards from the 
funds are made to entering students and to 
students enrolled in the School. 

Payison/Foreman Foundation Grant , Grants from 
this foundation are allocated in the spring 
semester for the education of women working 
for a college degree. The awards are made to 
students enrolled in the School. 



Samuel J. Moritz Scholarship Fund . Established in 
1960 as a memorial to Samuel J. Moritz, and made 
possible by a gift from Edward Moritz and LeRoy 
Moses, executors of his estate. The income provides 
scholarship aid annually to one or more students in 
need of financial aid. 

Clet a and Hen ry Offerman Scholarship . An endowed 
fund established in 1976 by a bequest from the 
Estate of Henry Offerman. The income from the fund 
is to be awarded to worthy students with professional 
potential who maintain satisfactory scholastic 
grades and who require financial aid to complete 
the course in nursing. 

Helena Rubinstein Foundation, Inc. Grant . Grants 
from this foundation are made available to the 
School and administered to students who have 
demonstrated need for financial aid. 

The Louis and Rachel Rudin Foundation Scholarship . 
Established in 1973 pursuant to the provisions of 
the will of Edward Rudin to provide for tuition and 
support of worthy students who would otherwise not 
be able to pursue careers as nurses. Scholarships 
are awarded to citizens of the United States with- 
out regard to age, sex, creed or race. 

The Christian C. Yegen Scholarship Fund . Established 
in the spring of 1965 as a memorial to Mr. Christian 
C. Yegen, father of an alumna of the Cornell Univ- 
ersity-New York Hospital School of Nursing. 

Federal Nursing Scholarship Program . The School 
participates in the federal Nursing Scholarship 
Program. These scholarships are available to 
baccalaureate students with exceptional financial 
need. 



10 



LOANS ADMINISTERED BY SCHOOL , 

Tudor Foundation Student Loan Fund , A loan fund 
established by the foundation and administered by 
the School to assist students in need of aid who 
hold scholarships or grants to defray the cost of 
tuition and who need further financial assistance 
to enable them to attend the School. Loans from 
the fund are not to exceed $1,000 to any one 
student in any one school year. 

Nursing Student Loan Program . As a result of the 
Nurse Training Act of 1971, students pursuing a 
half-time or full time course of study in nursing 
are considered eligible borrowers, as federal 
loan funds become available to assist students 
demonstrating financial need. In addition a 
student must intend to be matriculated and en- 
rolled at least half-time and demonstrate the 
need for financial assistance. In addition, the 
student must be a citizen or national of the 
United States, or have immigration status and 
personal plans to justify the conclusion that 
he or she intends to become a permanent resident 
of the United States. The maximum amount which 
may be borrowed in an academic year is $2,500. 

Interest accrues at the rate of 3% annually 
commencing nine months after the student leaves 
the program. (A maximum of 10 years is allowed 
for the final settlement of the loan.) 

A certain percentage of the loan is cancelled for 
each year the student serves full time as a 
professional nurse in any type of public or 
voluntary agency. More liberal cancellation 
provisions are available if this employment is in 
a geographic: area defined by the federal govern- 
ment as having a shortage of nurses. 



- 11 



I 



FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE ADMINISTERED 
BY OUTSIDE SOURCES 

New York State Regents Scholarships and Grants 

The following assistance is available for residents 
of New York State. 

Tuition Assistance Program (TAP) 

Application Procedure s: Applicants must apply 
annually to the New York State Higher Education 
Services Corporation (HESC) , Tower Building, Empire 
State Plaza, Albany, NY 12255. The application 
deadline for the 1978-79 academic year is March 31, 
1979. Application forms will be mailed, beginning 
in April 1978, to all: (1) students who received 
a TAP grant or Regents Scholarship award in 1977-78; 
(2) approved postsecondary institutions and high 
schools in New York State. 

Before submitting the application, the applicant 
should review it with the college financial aid 
officer, especially if there have been questions 
relating to completion of the application. 

The Higher Education Services Corporation determines 
the applicant's eligibility and mails an award 
certificate directly to the applicant indicating 
the amount of the grant. The applicant presents 
the Institutional Copy of the certificate at the 
time of payment of tuition. The postsecondary 
institution may defer payment on the basis of 
receipt of the award certificate. 

Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards: 
Tuition Assistance Program is an entitlement 
program. There is neither a qualifying examination 
nor a limited number of awards. The applicant must: 
(1) be a New York State resident and a U.S. citizen 

- 12 - 



or permanent resident alien; (2) be enrolled full 
time and matriculated at an approved New York State 
postsecondary institution; (3) have, if dependent, 
a family net taxable income below $20,001, or if 
independent and single with no tax dependents, a 
net taxable income below $5,667; and (4) be charged 
a tuition of at least $200 per year. 

The current definition of independent status 

is as follows: 

(1) 35 years of age or older on July 1, 1978; or 

(2) 22 years of age or older on July. 1,' 1978 and 
not: 

(a) resident in any house, apartment or 
building owned or leased by parents for 
more than 2 consecutive weeks in calendar 
years 1977, 1978, 1979. 

(b) claimed as a dependent by parents on 
their Federal or State income tax returns 
for 1977, 1978, 1979. 

(c) recipient of gifts, loans or other fin- 
ancial assistance in excess of $600 from 
parents in calendar years 1977, 1978, 1979 

Undergraduate students may generally receive TAP 
awards for four years of study. Students enrolled 
in approved five-year programs, or in a State- 
sponsored opportunity program, may receive under- 
graduate awards for five years. 

Award Schedule ; The amount of the TAP award is 
scaled according to level of study, tuition charge, 
and net taxable income. 

College Work-Study Program (CWS) 

Application Procedures : Application is made 
through the postsecondary institutional financial 
aid office. Eligibility is determined and work 
arrangements made at this point. 



- 13 



Selection of Recipients and Allocation of Awards : 
The applicant must be enrolled at least half-time 
in an approved postsecondary institution. 

An institution must make employment reasonably 
available to all eligible students in the institu- 
tion who are in need of financial aid. In the event 
that more students are eligible for CWS than there 
are funds available, preference is given to students 
who have great financial need and who must earn a 
part of their educational expenses. 

Award Schedule : The postsecondary institution 
arranges jobs on campus, or off campus, with public 
or private nonprofit agencies, such as hospitals, 
for up to 40 hours per week. 

Factors considered by the financial aid office in 
determining whether, and how many hours, the 
applicant may Cork under this program are: financial 
need; class schedule; academic progress; and health 
status. 

Level of salary must be at least 80 percent of the 
minimum wage; maximum wage is dependent on the 
nature of the job and applicant qualifications. 

Rights and Responsibilities of Recipients : Sat- 
isfactory academic progress must be maintained. 

LOANS ADMINISTERED BY 
OUTSIDE SOURCES 

New York Higher Education Assistance Corporation 
sponsors a program through which students may 
obtain loans from local savings banks. 

Student Eligibility Requirements 

3}o qualify for a loan, a student must be: 

1. A bona-fide resident of New York State for at 

- 14 - 



i 



least one year prior to date of application. 
(A student who resides in New York solely 
for the purpose of attending school is not 
eligible for a loan.) 

2. A citizen or permanent resident of the 
United States. (Declaration of intention 
of becoming a citizen must be submitted 
with the application.) 

3. Enrolled in or accepted for admittance as 
a full time or half-time student at an 
approved institution; if enrolled, the 
applicant must be in good standing. 

Application Procedure 

1. The student obtains a loan application 
from a participating lending institution 
in an area of permanent residence or from 
the financial aid office of an approved 
education institution. 

2. The student and parents or spouse complete 
the NYHEAC application according to the 
instructions and the student submits the 
application to an authorized school 
official. 

3. The Corporation determines the eligibility 
of the student and notifies the student, 
lender and educational institution of loan 
disposition. 

4. If the loan has been approved, the student 
signs a Promissory Note at the lending in- 
stitution prior to the disbursement of funds, 
and acknowledges the Statement of Respon- 
sibilities on the reverse side of the note. 

5. The lender will disburse the funds at 

- 15 - 



a time agreed upon with the student. For 
the school year beginning in the fall, funds 
may not be disbursed earlier than August 1. 

Amount Which May Be Borrowed 

The maximum amount which may be borrowed in one 
academic year is - 

College Graduate Student $2,500. 

Registered Nurse Student $2,000. 

This amount may be reduced depending upon previous 
indebtedness to N^HEAC. 

A student's eligibility to receive interest benefits 
is based on adjusted annual family income* at the 
time the loan is guaranteed. A student whose 
adjusted family income is less than $25,000 is 
eligible for a full interest subsidy, during the 
time he/she is in school, and for a following nine- 
month grace period before repayment must begin. An 
annual insurance premium of 1 percent of the loan 
amount is payable in full at the time the check is 
issued. 

Rights and Responsibilities of Recipients ; A student 
may borrow at a relatively low interest rate 
(currently 7 percent) with no repayment as long as 
he/she remains enrolled at least half-time, and for 
nine months after he/she ceases to be at least a 
half-time student. Payment of principal may further 
be deferred during study under a graduate fellow- 
ship program approved by the U.S. Commissioner of 
Education, during up to three years of active U.S. 
armed forces service, during up to three years as 
a full-time Peace Corps or VISTA or similar national 
program volunteer, or during up to 12 months of 
unsuccessful search for full-time employment. 

If a student applies for an additional loan, 

16 - 






application must be made to the original lending 
institution. 

*Gross family income less 10 percent, less dollar 
value of deductions claimed, on most recent Federal 
income tax 'return. 

Four months after ceasing to be at least a half- 
time student, the borrower must make formal 
arrangements with the lending institution to begin 
repayment. The following regulations apply: 

(1) Depending on the amount of the loan, the 
minimum monthly payment will be $30 plus 
interest. Under unusual and extenuating 
circumstances the lender, on request, may 
permit reduced payments. 

(2) The maximum repayment period is 10 years. 

(3) The maximum period of a loan from date of 
the original note may not exceed 15 years, 
excluding authorized deferments of pay- 
ments . 

(4) Repayment in whole or part may be made 
at any time without penalty. 



HOUSING 

FACILITIES 

Students attending the School of Nursing may live 
in University housing or select their own living 
facilities within the community. 

There are two main residence facilities for nursing 



17 



students. Assignments to a particular facility 
are made based upon a priority system established 
by the students. 

F.W. Olin Hall, which is located at 445 East 69 
Street, contains a gymnasium, snack bar, lounge 
rooms, and 278 residence rooms. Each room is 
furnished as a single bedroom-study but, since two 
rooms share a connecting bath, they may be used 
as a suite for two students, if desired. The rooms 
are completely furnished and linen service is 
provided. Student rental for an academic year, 
which runs from September 1 to May 31, is $1020. 

Jacob S. Lasdon House, located at 420 East 70 
Street, provides fully furnished, carpeted, and 
air-conditioned apartments with kitchens, dining 
areas, living rooms and baths for both second- 
year single and all married nursing students, as 
well as Medical and graduate students registered in 
Cornell University. Single students may share a 
one-or two-bedroom apartment. By using the living 
room and the bedroom(s) as individual bedroom-study 
rooms, two students may share a one-bedroom apart- 
ment. Four single students may share a two-bedroom 
apartment if two students share each bedroom. There 
are a limited number of studio apartments for 
married students. The rents for the various units 
in Lasdon House range from $249 per month to $420 
per month for the 1978-79 academic year, which 
runs from September 1 to May 31. 

REGULATIONS 

Students signing leases for University housing must 
notify the appropriate office at least thirty days 
in advance of any move or change of 
roommate. 

Students living a distance from the School should 
consider the time to be spent in commuting each day. 

- 18 - 



1978-1979 COURSE OFFERINGS 



NURSING COURSES 

All academic courses of the University are open 
to students of all races, religions, ethnic origins, 
ages, sexes, and political persuasions. No re- 
quirement, prerequisite, device, rule, or other 
means shall be used by any employee of the Univ- 
ersity to encourage, establish or maintain seg- 
regation on the basis of race, religion, ethnic 
origin, age, sex, or political persuasion in 
any academic course of the University. 

157 Parent -Child Nursing Fall. Credit: five 
hours, theory; five hours, clinical laboratory. 
Prerequisite: Nursing 156. Registration for this 
course is by advisement. E.W. Haas and faculty. 
Emphasis is placed on nursing assessment and inter- 
vention in relation to health needs of women, 
their children, and the role of the father. Theory 
and practice related to social trends, family in- 
fluences, and normal growth and development "are 
integrated throughout the course. Experiences 
are provided for the promotion and maintenance of 
optimal health to families in a variety of settings. 

256 Community Health: Care of Patients with Environ - 
mentally Related Health Problems Fall. Credit: 
five hours, theory; five hours, clinical labor- 
atory. Prerequisites: Nursing 156. Registration 
for this course is by advisement. D. Pearlmutter 
and faculty. 

Focus is on the prevention and control of selected 
community health problems such as cerebral vascular 
accident, mental illness, and social problems such 
as addiction. The modality of nursing care will be 
both individual (therapeutic nurse-patient relation- 
ship) and group (family) in acute psychiatric 



- 19 



hospital settings and the community. The common 
denominator utilized in teaching the selected 
community health problems will be the epidem- 
iological approach. Experience is provided for 
students to observe and participate in group 
process. 

N257 Dimensions of Nursing Spring. Credit: four 
hours, theory; eight hours, clinical laboratory. 
Prerequisites: Nursing 156, 157, 256 and 360. J.B. 
Dorie and faculty. 

Selected aspects of professional nurse practice are 
studied: care of patients with multiple and complex 
needs, including those with cancer; sharing respon- 
sibility for nursing care of groups of patients; 
and participating in the leadership activities 
related to nursing care. A variety of settings 
will be used for clinical learning. 

365 Clinical Nursing-Acute Care of Children or 
Adults Fall. Credit: five hours. Prerequisite: 
Course 360 must be taken prior to or concurrently 
with this course. Required course: registered 
nurses not taking Course 366. Limited enrollment 
and by advisement. M. Sugimcto and faculty. 
Within this clinical experience core, the student 
has the opportunity to develop proficiency in the 
exercise of clinical judgment and skills requisite 
to the supportive management of children or adults 
who require continuous, comprehensive observation 
in an intensive or critical care environment. 
Opportunities are provided for systematic study in 
a clinical area of interest. The focus is on 
nursing functions, assessment and problem-related 
intervention through health counseling, health 
education, and preventive, restorative and 
therapeutic measures. Associated seminars serve 
as a mode for extending the scope of knowledge and 
experience and for developing professional peer 
communication and decision-making skills. Fifteen 



20 



hours of combined practice and correlated seminars 
are required each week 

366 Clinical Nursing Long-term or Chronic Illness 
of Children or Adults Fall, Credit: five hours. 
Prerequisite: Course 360 must be taken prior to or 
concurrently with this course. Required course: 
registered nurses not taking Course 365. Limited 
enrollment and by advisement. M. Sugimbtu and 
faculty. 

Within this clinical experience core the student 
has the opportunity to develop proficiency in the 
exercise of clinical judgment and skills requisite 
to the supportive management of children or adults 
with long-term or progressive chronic illness. 
Opportunities are provided for systematic study in 
a clinical area of interest. The focus is on nursing 
functions; on assessment and problem-related inter- 
vention through health counseling, health education, 
and preventive, restorative, and therapeutic 
measures. Associated seminars serve as a mode for 
extending the scope of knowledge and experience 
and for developing professional peer communication 
and decision-making skills. Fifteen hours of 
combined practice and correlated seminars are re- 
quired each week. 

367 Clinical Nursing -Primary Care of Children or 
Adults Spring. Credit: five hours. Prerequisite: 
Nursing 365 or 366. Required course: registered 
nurses. Limited enrollment and by advisement. 
Course chairman to be announced. 

Within this clinical experience core the student 
has the opportunity to develop proficiency in 
the initial screening assessment of the psychosocial 
and physical status of children or adults and 
responsibility of the continuum of care of selected 
patients within the protocols mutually agreed upon 
by medical and nursing personnel. Experiences 



- 21 



offer opportunities for the reinforcement or 
development of skills in case finding, interpreta- 
tion of selected laboratory tests, health counsel- 
ing, health teaching and techniques of surveillance 
and management of care for the selected patients 
(children or adults) in ambulatory care settings. 
Associated seminars serve as a mode for extending 
the scope of knowledge and experience and for 
developing professional peer communication and 
decision-making skills. Fifteen hours of com- 
bined practice and correlated seminars are re- 
quired each week. 

360a Assessment of Health Status of Adults Fall, 
Credit: two hours. Prerequisite: Biological 
Science 133; prerequisite or concurrent enrollment 
in Biological Science 136. Required: all students. 
M. Cotterell. 

Supervised practice in techniques of observation, 
interviewing, percussion, palpation, and ausculta- 
tion with emphasis on normal ranges of the healthy 
individual. The course includes relevant anatomy, 
physiology, and pathology basic to understanding 
the significance of findings. Four hours of combined 
conference and practice are required each week. 

360b Assessment of Health Status of Children 
Intersession. Credit: One. Prerequisite: 
Biological Science 133; prerequisite or con- 
current enrollment in Biological Science 136 and 
Nursing 360a. G. Glass. 

Supervised practice in techniques of observation, 
interviewing, percussion, palpation, and ausculta- 
tion with emphasis on normal ranges of the healthy 
individual. The course includes relevant anatomy, 
physiology, and pathology basic to understanding 
the significance of findings. 



22 



PROFESSIONALLY RELATED COURSES 

134 Biological Science Fall Credit: three hours 
Prerequisite: Biological Science 133. Required prior 
to or concurrent with Nursing 157. R.S. Rubenstein. 
The course includes some aspects of human reproductive 
physiology; male and female anatomy, sex steroids, 
birth control, and maternal physiology. Also covered 
are principles of heredity and medical genetics. 
There will be a survey of pathogenic micro-organisms 
to acquaint the student with communicable diseases 
that are endemic and epidemic. 

136 Biological Science Fall. Credit: three hours. 
Prerequisite: Biological Science 133. Required 
course: all students. V. Stolar, 
Morphological and functional study of the nervous 
system in man. Histology, neurotransmitters, gross 
anatomy, stimulus -response, and integrative control 
are covered. The physiology of striated, smooth, 
and cardiac muscle will be included. 

109 Life-span Growth and Development, Part I 
Fall. Credit: two hours. Required course: all 
students unless exempt by school approved examination. 
L. Bellig. 

Study of the critical stages and periods in the 
life cycle from conception through adolescent years. 
Discussion of psychophysiological and psychosocial 
factors that produce a range of human behavior will 
be based on work of theorists such as Piaget, 
Erickson, and Freud. 

110 Life-span Growth and Development, Part II 
Fall. Credit: two hours. Prerequisite: 109 Life- 
span Growth and Development. Required course: all students 
V. Stolar 9 Theories and concepts relevant to the 
biological, psychological, and sociological aspects 

of aging. Emphasis is placed on the normal aging 



23 - 



process; the significance of the usual life style 
of the individual and the potential consequences of 
interaction with physical and social environment; 
developmental tasks; and attitudes toward aging of 
individuals and society. 

108 Introduction to Research Fall and spring. 
Credit: two hours. Required course: all students. 
E. Smith. 

Introduction to skills requisite to critical review 
of published research in the health field. The 
purpose of the course is to develop intelligent 
consumers of research. 

207 Nursing in the Social Order Fall and spring. 
Credit: two hours. Required course: all students. 
L. Schwager. 

The structure and function of both formal and 
informal social organizations are considered, 
especially as they influence the work of the pro- 
fessionalnurse in the delivery of health services. 

140 Pharmacology Fall and spring. Credit: two 
hours. Prerequisite: Nursing 156 or equivalent. 
Required course: registered nurses; other students 
by advisement. R.S. Rubenstein. 

The emphasis of the course is on the basic principles 
of pharmacology. These principles are elaborated 
in discussion of drugs acting on selected physio- 
logical systems, such as the nervous and cardio- 
vascular. Drug interactions will be included, 

247 Epidemiology Spring. Credit: two hours. 
Required course: registered nurses; other students 
by advisement. R.S. Rubenstein. 

Introductory course in which the meaning and scope 
of epidemiology are considered. Relevant content 
is drawn from biostatistics, microbiology, environ- 
mental studies, and health service adminstration. 

- 24 - 



Particular emphasis is on scientific appraisal of 
patterns of health and disease in society. 

Spanish for Health Professionals Spring. Credit: 
two hours. Prerequisite: Pretesting for section 
assignment. Elective. Language Lab Staff. 
The course assists the person already familiar 
with Spanish to develop skills in conversation 
as it relates to health care services. 

Women 1 s Health Spring. Credit: two hours, theory; 
Prerequisite: Nursing 157 and Biological Science 
134 or its equivalent or permission of the in- 
structor. Elective: limited enrollment 
R.S. Rubens te in. 

An advanced seminar course in selected topics 
regarding the health care of women. Topics to be 
included are health maintenance for women; 
gynecological problems; adolescent services; 
population and epidemiological approaches to 
identifying problem areas in women 1 s health; 
and the influence of the women f s movement on 
health care services to women. A contract between 
the students and the faculty will be negotiated 
regarding the topics to be covered. Class part- 
icipation, individual and/or group projects, and 
a paper will be required. 

Food and Nutrition for Health Spring. Credit: 
two hours. Prerequisite: Nursing 156 or its 
equivalent prior to or concurrently with this 
course, elective: limited enrollment. D. Erlander, 
A study of the multiple factors, such as culture, 
religious -philosophic orientation, and health 
status, that affect food intake with emphasis on 
helping individuals sustain or alter their eating 
patterns to promote quality of life. Attention 
will be focused on normal nutrition with or 
without modified diets. 

- 25 - 






Independent Study Offers the student an opportunity 
to delineate an area of interest for guided, 
systematic study under the sponsorship oi a faculty 
member. Planned essentially for the winter inter- 
session, on-or off-campus study is possible for 
credit ranging from one to four hours. Registration 
by endorsement of a faculty sponsor. 
Selected faculty. 

Guided Study Offers qualified students an oppor- 
tunity to participate in a specially designed 
program of study and course visitation under the 
direction of a faculty member. It permits part- 
icipation in classes, seminars, conferences, 
library research, and selected nursing service 
programs. Offered during the regular term dates 
or in January. May be taken for credit or no 
credit. Request for attendance is filed in the 
Office of the Dean. A special fee is established 
after consultation with the dean. 

Clinical Nursing Practicum-Selected Hea l th Problems 
of Children or Adults January Intersession. Credit: 
none. Professors of clinical practice and clinical 
preceptors, A clinical practice experience in the 
assessment, planning, provision, and evaluation 
of nursing care for patients in selected patient 
care settings of The New York Hospital. Nursing 
Service personnel, head nurses, or clinical special- 
ists will function as preceptors. A three-week 
period of practice and seminars is required. Student 
placement for clinical experience is dependent upon 
restrictions that relate to patient care services, 
the availability of nursing service personnel 
resources, and nursing service administrative 
policies. 



26 



CORNELL UNIVERSITY 
REGISTER 

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION 

Frank H.T. Rhodes, President of the University 
Dale R. Corson, Chancellor of the University 
W. Keith Kennedy, University Provost 
Theodore- Cooper, Dean of the Medical College 

and Provost for Medical Affairs 
William G. Herbster, Senior Vice President 
Mark Barlow, Jr., Vice Provost 
Constance E. Cook, Vice President for Land- 
grant Affairs 
17. Donald Cooke, Vice President for Research 
June M. Fessenden-Raden, Vice Provost 
William D. Gurowitz, Vice President for Campus 

Affairs 
Robert T. Horn, Vice President and Treasurer 
Samuel A. Lawrence, Vice President for 

Financial and Planning Services 
Robert M. Matyas, Vice President for 

Facilities and Business Operations 
Richard M. Ramin, Vice President for Public 

Affairs 
Kenneth I. Greisen, Dean of the University 

Faculty 
Neal R. Stamp, University Counsel and Secretary 

of the Corporation 

THE NEW YORK HOSPITAL- 
CORNELL MEDICAL CENTER 
ADMINISTRATION 

H. Mefford Runyon, Secretary 
Vivian M. Schuler, Assistant Secretary 
Eamon Brennan, Director, Public Affairs 
Stephen J. Smallwood, Director, Development 



- 27- 



NEW YORK HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATION 

David D. Thompson, MD. , Director 

Melville, A. Piatt, M.D., Executive Associate 

Director, Professional Services 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., Senior Associate 

Director, Nursing Services 
Julius D'Elia, Senior Associate Director, 

Administrative and Engineering Services 
H. Henry Bertram, Associate Director, Personnel 

Services 
Cosmo J. LaCosta, Associate Director, General 

Services 
Frank P. Ravenna, Associate Director, Financial 

Services 
H. Mefford Runyon, Associate Director, Corporate 

Affairs 
Anne A. Cote, Assistant to the Director 

JOINT BOARD 

REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE BOARD OF 
TRUSTEES OF CORNELL UNIVERSITY 

Dale R. Corson, Chairman 1978 
Arthur H. Dean, Emeritus 
Robert W. Purcell 
Harold D. Uris 
Stephen H. Weiss 

REPRESENTATIVES FROM THE BOARD OF 
GOVERNORS OF THE SOCIETY OF THE 
NEW YORK HOSPITAL 

Mrs. John Elliott, Jr. 
Stanley DeJ. Osborne 

Kenneth H. Hannan 
Frederick K. Trask, Jr., Emeritus 
John Hay Whitney, Emeritus 
Walter B. Wriston 

- 28 - 



NON-VOTING MEMBERS 

Theodore Cooper, M.D., Cornell University Provost for 

Medical Affairs and Dean, Cornell University 

Medical College 
David D. Thompson, M.D. , Vice-President and 

Director of The Society of the New York Hospital 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc, R.N. , Dean 

Cornell University-New York Hospital School 

of Nursing 

OFFICERS OF THE SCHOOL 



Frank H.T. Rhodes, Ph.D., President of the 

University 
Dale R. Corson, Chancellor of the University 
W. Keith Kennedy, Ph.D., Provost of the University 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc, (Hon.), R.N. , 

Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor 

of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N., Associate Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N. , Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Helen M. Berg, Ed.D., R.N. , Assistant Dean 
Judith A. Court, M.A., Assistant Dean 

FACULTY AND STAFF 

ADMINISTRATION 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.), R.N., 

Dean of the School of Nursing and Professor 

of Nursing 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A., R.N. , Associate Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A., R.N. , Assistant Dean 

and Assistant Professor of Nursing 
Helen M. Berg, Ed.D., R.N. , Assistant Dean 
Judith A. Court, M.A., Assistant Dean 



29 



( 



Meimi Joki, A.B., Assistant to the Dean 
Edna Johnson, Director of Student Relations 



UNDERGRADUATE FACULTY 

Professor of Nursing 

Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.)> R.N,, 
Teachers College, Columbia University 

Associate Professors of Nursing 

Mary Bielski, M.S., R.N. , Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N. , Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N. , New York University 
Deanna R. Pearlmutter, Ed.D., R.N., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Laura L. Simms, Ed.d., R.N., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Elisabeth Dorsey Ivey Smith, Ed.D., R.N., Teachers 

College, Columbia University 

Associate Professor of Science 

Reva Scharf Rubenstein, Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute 
of Brooklyn 

Assistant Professors of Nursing 

Eddie Mae Barnes, M.A., R.N. , Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Marion Peters Braxton, M.P.H., R.N. , Johns Hopkins 

University 



-30 



Sarah E. Cook, M.A. , R.N. , Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Margaret Cotterell, M.A., R.N., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Sister Catherine M. Cummings, M.S.N. , R.N., 

Case Western Reserve University* 
Lynne J. Dawson, M.P.H., R.N., Columbia University 
Margot DeSevo, A.M., R.N. , New York University 
Jeanne B. Dorie, M.A. , R.N. , Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Bonnie Jones Friedman, M.Ed., R.N. , Teachers College, 

Columbia University** 
Geraldine K. Glass, M.A., R.N. , Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Eleanora Haas, M.A. , R.N., C.N.M. , Columbia University 
Louise S. Hazeltine, M.A. , R.N , New York University 
Ann Keith-Kurtis, M.A. , R.N. , New York University 
Helen King, M.A., R.N,, New York University 
Katherine A. Knight, M.Ed., R.N. , Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Melvina J. Lohmann, M.Ed., R.N. , Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Martha A. McNiff, M.A. , R.N. , New York University 
Agnes E. Morgan, M.A. , R.N., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Lois Schwager, M.A., R.N. , New York University 
Marie D. Strickland, M.Ed,, R.N. , Teachers 

College, Columbia University 
Madeleine S. Sugimoto, M.Ed., M.A. , R.N., Teachers 

College, Columbia University 
Janet Swanson, M.S., R.N,, Teachers College, 

Columbia University 
Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N., Teachers College, 

Columbia University 

Assistant Professor of Science 

Vera Stolar, M.S., R.N. , Hunter College 

* On leave 1978-1979 academic year 
** On leave Fall 1978 semester 

- 31 .- 



Assistant Professor of Nutrition 

I. Darlene Erlander, M.A., R.D., Teachers College, 
Columbia University 

Instructor in Nursing 

Nancy M. Sweeney, M.A., R.N. , Nev? York University 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

Nina T. Argondizzo, M.A. , R.N. , Assistant Professor 

of Nursing, Assistant Dean 
Rachel Ayers, M.S., R.N., Assistant Professor, 

Memorial Division of Nursing 
Mary Bartlett, M.S., R.N. , Instructor in Nursing 
Linda L. Bellig, M.A., R.N., Instructor and 

Coordinator (Perinatology) 
Mary T. Bielski, M.A., R.N. , Associate Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Head, Medical 

Nursing 
Barbara Boyce, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Amy Chou, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Margaret Cristiano, B.S., R.N., Assistant in 

Instruction (OB-GYN) 
Edna Danielsen, M.A. , R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 
Virginia Dericks, M.A., R.N,, Assistant Professor of 

Nur s ing 
Dorothy Ellison, M.A., R.N. , Associate Professor of 

Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department fiead, 

Operating Room Nursing 
Joanne Foster, M.A. , R.N., Administrative Liaison, 

Assistant Director of Nursing Service 
Christina L. Haas, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Alice Hugo, M.A., R.N., Assistant Professor in 

Nursing 
Patricia Jones, M.A. , R.N., Assistant Professor of 

Nursing 

- 3f- 



Carol Keller s M»S OJ C,N 9 M e , R.N,;, Associate 

Clinical Specialist (OB-GYN) 
Eleanor C. Lambertsen, Ed.D., D.Sc. (Hon.) R.N. , 

Professor of Nursing; Dean of the School of 

Nursing 
Martha Leonard, M.N. , R.N. , Instructor in 

Nursing 
Emelia Luddy-Turner, M.A., R.N., Instructor in 

Nursing 
Patricia Mahoney, M.4^, R.N. , Instructor in 

Nursing 
Aurora Mamaril, M.A., R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Dorothy Manager ,M. A. , R.N., Instructor in Nursing 
Marjorie A. Miller, M.S., R.N. , Associate 

Professor of Nursing 
Patricia M. f Regan, M.A., R.N. , Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Susan Papera, M.A. , C.N.M. , Instructor in Nursing 
Lena J. Saffioti,M.A. , R.N. , Assistant Professor 

bf Nursing 
Doris Schwartz, M.A. , R.N. , Associate Professor 

of Nursing 
Laura L. Simms, Ed.D., R.N., Associate Professor 

of Nursing; Clinical Nursing Department Haad, 

Surgical Nursing 
Marie D, Strickland, M.Ed., R.N., Assistant 

Professor of Nursing; Clinical Nursing 

Department Head, Obstetrics -Gynecology and 

Pediatrics 
Grace Sullivan, B.S.N. , R.N., Assistant in 

Instruction 
Anne-Marie Thorn, M.A., R.N. , Adjunct Assistant 

Professor of Nursing 
Barbara Topf-Olstein, M.A., R.N. , Instructor in Nursing 
Carolyn E. Wagner, M.A., R.N. , Assistant 

Professor of Nursing; Clinical Nursing 

Department Head, Out-patient Department 

EMERITUS PROFESSORS 

Muriel R. Carbery, MS., R.N. , Professor Emeritus 
of Nursing p ^ 



Virginia M« Dunbar, M.A. , R.N. , Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing and Dean Emeritus 
Mary Klein, M.A,, R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Margery T. Overholser, R.N., Professor Emeritus of 

Nursing 
Bessie A # R. Parker, B.S., R.N., Professor Emeritus 

of Nursing 
Veronica Lyons Roehner, M.A. , R.N., Professor 

Emeritus of Nursing 
Henderika J. Rynbergen, M.S., Professor Emeritus of 

Science 

CLASS OF 1979 

The name of the student is followed by his or her 
home address. The college or university from which 
the student transferred is given in parentheses. 

PROGRAM FOR COLLEGE GRADUATES 

Anderson, Sylvia, Malakal, Sudan (Occidental College) 
Archodis, {Catherine, Rego Park, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Ashley, Janet, Cromwell, Connecticut (University of 

Vermont) 
Azzolini, John, Staten Island, New York (State 

University of New York at Binghamton) 
Baldwin, Richard, Staten Island, New York (Wagner 

College) 
Beirne, Margaret, New York, New York (Trinity College) 
Bezjak, John, New York, New York (Hunter College) 
Blickman, Andrea, Englewood, New Jersey (University 

of Rochester) 
Brassil, Elizabeth, VJest Hartford, Connecticut 

(Holy Cross College) 
Brown, Martha, San Jose, California (University of 

California) 

Carroll, Janet, New York, New York (Brown University) 

Childs, Diana, New York, New York (Sarah Lawrence 

College) 

- 34 - 



Clotfelter, Anne, Grinnell, Iowa (Luther College) 
Craw, Anne, Westport, Connecticut (Cornell 

University) 
Cuddy, Deborah, Middletown, New York (Heidelberg 

College) 
Dougherty, Ellen, Trenton, New Jersey (Boston 

University) 
Elliot, Elizabeth, New Rochella, New York 

(Syracuse University) 
Falkenberg, John, Oceanside, New York (State 

University of New York at Albany) 
Feinstein, Susan, New York, New York (University 

of Colorado) 
Ferrer a, Rosemarie, Schenectady, New York (State 

University of New York at Albany) 
Finn, Mary, Merion, Pennsylvania (St, Joseph's 

College) 
Fox, Lee, New York, New York (Smith College) 
Franklin, Carole, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Gaer, Judy, Port Jervis, New York (Ithaca College) 
Gaffney, Patricia, Bronx, New York (Iona College) 
Galfo, Susan, Conklin, New York (Cornell University) 
Goldberg, Ilene, New York, New York (State 

University of New York at Binghamton) 
Golub, Zola, Bronx, New York (Barnard College) 
Grover, Patricia, Grandville, Michigan (Albion 

College) 
Hausser, Jeanne, Brooklyn, New York (St. Joseph's 

College) 
Hietanen, Joanne, Springfield, Massachusetts 

(University of Massachusetts) 
Hooke, Phyllis, New York, New York (Mount Holyoke 

College) 
Hsu, Jane, Port Jervis, New York (Marymount College) 
Hynes, Mary, New York, New York (University of 

Rochester) 
Johnson, Marguerite, Ridgewood, New Jersey (The 

King's College) 
Johnson, Martha, Holden, Massachusetts (Colgate 

University) 

-3? - 



Kane, Karen, Brooklyn, New York, (St. Francis College) 
Kaplan, Donna, Springfield, New Jersey (Kenyon 

College) 
Kleinberg, Joanne, Minnetonka, Minnesota (University 

of Minnesota) 
Kling, Deborah, New York, New York (Univereifey of 

Illinois) 
Kozay, Lauren, Cresskill, New Jersey, (Newton College 

of the Sacred Heart) 
Lang, Ruth, Grand Blanc, Michigan (Albion College) 
Lawson, Barbara, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (Mount 

Holyoke College) 
Lehey, Timothy, Bellerose, New York (York College) 
Leslie, Claudia, Fayetteville, New York (Trinity 

College) 
Levinson, Amy, Rochester, New York (State 

University of New York at Binghamton) 
Liljedahl, Jane, Middletown, Connecticut (Marymount 

College) 
Lonski, Linda, Buffalo, New York (State University 

of New York at Buffalo) 
Mangione, Donna, Stony Brook, New York (University 

of Notre Dame) 
Marticelli, Barbara, Pittsford, New York (University 

of Vermont) 
Masters, Sarah, St. Louis, Missouri (Kirkland College) 
McCormick, Kathleen, Newark, Delaware (Bucknell 

University) 
Mehl, Sloan, New York, New York (State University 

of New York at Stony 3rook) 
Mendelsohn, Sally, Evanston, Illinois (Brandeis 

University) 
Metsa, Doris, Chassell, Michigan, (Michigan 

Technical University) 
Midney, Paul, South Meriden, Connecticut (Trinity 

College) 
Miller, John, Reading, Pennsylvania (Ursinus College) 
Moldawsky, Barbara, Brooklyn, New York (State 
University at Brockport) 



36 - 



Murphy, Margaret, Detroit, Michigan (Kenyon College) 
Nierenberg, Susan, Teaneck, New Jersey (Douglass 

College) 
O'Malley, Ellen, Weston, Connecticut (Beloit College) 
Parker, Beth, Seal Beach, California (University of 

California at Berkeley) 
Patterson, Martha, Pearl River, New York (Barnard 

College) 
Pieper, Pamela, Silver Spring, Maryland (Franklin 

and Marshal College) 
Quinn, John, New York, New York (Fairfield University) 
Rathmell, Dariel, Ramsey, New Jersey (Luther College) 
Rooney, Linda, Holmdel, New Jersey (Wells College) 
Schneider, Nancy, New York, New York (Barnard College) 
Schwend, Virginia, Sierra Madre, California 

(California State University at Los Angeles) 
Siebers, Sandra, Whitney Point, New York (State 

University College at Geneseo) 
Siegel, Roberta, Massepequa, New York (University of 

Colorado at Boulder) 
Sorensen, Lynne, Boston, Massachusetts (Connecticut 

College) 
Sperling, Joyce, Floral Park, New York (Smith College) 
Stack, Anne, Manlius, New York (Colgate University) 
Staniewicz, Kathleen, Beacon, New York (Trinity 

College) 
Sullivan, Nancy, New York, New York (University of 

Pennsylvania) 
Szallar, Lynn, Astoria, New York (York College) 
Talisman, Michelle, Great Neck, New York (Sarah 

Lawrence College) 
Thomsen, Anne, Putnam Valley, New York (State 

University of New York at Oneonta) 
Tofias, Lauren, Newton, Massachusetts (University 

of Vermont) 
Vanderpoorten, Mary, Castro Valley, California 

(University of California at Berkeley 
Walcyk, Patricia, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey 

(Stanford University) 
Welsh, Judith, Sacramento, California (Western 

Michigan University) 

- 37 - 



Wertheim, Susan, Weston, Connecticut (Johns. Hopkins 

University) 
Wisner, Claire, Brooklyn, New York (St. Francis 

College) 
Wolf, Cheryl, LaJolla, California (Stanford 

University) 
Wyles, Dana, New York, New York (University of 

Michigan) 

REGISTERED NURSE STUDENTS 

Bilog-Sambat, Aida, New York, New York (University of 

Santo Tornas) 
Chant anakom, Nongyao, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Coyle, Nessa, New York, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Coyne, Eileen, New Y^rk, New York (Staten Island 

Community College) 
Donohue, Sharon, New York, New York (Suffolk 

County Community College) 
Doyle, Marita, Fort Lee, New Jersey (Seton Hall 

University) 
Frederick, Nancy, New York, New York (Suffolk 

County Community College) 
Harrell, Linda, Brooklyn, New York (Brooklyn College) 
Kasemsawat, Chongkol, New York, New York (Hunter 

College) 
Lee, Mi-Ok, New York, New York (Hunter College) 
Mallahan-Reebe, Jean, New York, New York (Staten 

Island Community College) 
Paik, Hae Sook, New York, New York (Brooklyn College) 
Peck, Robert, New York, New York (University of the 

Americas) 
Penkala, Cecelia, New York, New York (Marymount 

Manhattan College) 
Ritter, Andrea, Flushing, New York (Hunter College) 
Shields, Joan, New York, New York (Staten Island 

Community College) 
Stoddart, Donna, New York, New York (Fairleigh 

Dickinson University) 

- 38 *- 



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